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vehicle history reports are now mandatory for all car dealers

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July 1 all car dealers must make a vehicle history available

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All vehicles with history must have a red sticker posted on the car

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record price for used car sales ( 27 million dollars )

Jay Leno Quail Car Show - H 2013
Getty Images
Jay Leno holds court at The Quail car show in Monterey on Friday.

Jay Leno and Patrick Dempsey are among the stars at the automotive event, where cars with Hollywood histories have mostly fizzled.

PEBBLE BEACH, Calif – Vintage Ferrari sales are breaking records up in Monterey, Calif., this weekend, where the Cannes of the automotive world is underway.

On Saturday night, a 275 Ferrari N.A.R.T. Spyder hammered at $25 million (or $27.5 million, if you include the standard 10 percent commission). Another Italian beauty — a 1953 Ferrari 375 MM — sold on Friday night for slightly more than $9 million. Both sales went down at the RM Auctions sales.

PHOTOS: Hollywood’s Private Jets: From Oprah Winfrey to Tom Cruise, Who Owns What

Meanwhile, entertainment biz folks are thin on the ground here, where multiple events are taking place over a long weekend on the Monterey Peninsula. Car enthusiasts Jay Leno and PatrickDempsey did make the trek and milled around Friday’s $550-a-ticket car show at The Quail. Dempsey caught up with Formula One champ Michael Schumacher, who spoke on a panel during the show with former Ferrari CEO Jean Todt. But other biz regulars at the annual Monterey motoring events are MIA, including Fox chairman Jim Gianopulosand attorney Alan Wertheimer.

“Too much work,” was Wertheimer’s excuse via text from Los Angeles.

And comedian Adam Carolla, who was racing his Nissan at the nearby Laguna Seca racetrack on Saturday, said, “I actually have to work tonight.” He had a stand-up gig in the area. “Yeah, it helps pay for some of this,” he said as he motioned to his car, which used to be raced by Paul Newman. (Carolla added he’s working on a Newman documentary.)

There were several cars with Hollywood histories and provenances at the auctions here, but not many fetched big sales. At the Gooding & Company sale on Saturday night, a 1927 Rolls-Royce Phantom I Playboy Roadster that made an appearance in Giant went for $341,000, while the 1920 Locomobile 48 Sportif, seen in the 1992 Robert Downey Jr. film Chaplin, came off the block at $176,000 — both selling at the low end of their estimates.

Hedy Lamarr‘s husband’s prewar French Delage D8-120 sold for $770,000 at Gooding. But the ’63 Corvette Sting Ray race car featured in the Elvis Presley film Viva Las Vegas (estimated at $375,000-$475,000) didn’t sell at Friday night’s RM auction because it didn’t fetch its reserve price.

Sunday’s final auction at Gooding isn’t expected to eclipse Saturday night’s Ferrari record, but perhaps the motorheads will be exhausted anyway — after a full day of walking the Pebble Beach lawn, where the annual Concours D’Elegance is unfolding under foggy skies.

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To subscribe to the e-mail alert service logon to www.emailalert.dmv.ca.gov/subscriptions.asp.

This page contains detailed instructions on how to subscribe.
The Industry Tools Home Page located at

http://www.dmv.ca.gov/vr/dealer_regservice.htm

provides convenient access to information and links that are pertinent to the vehicle registration industry.

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gamechanger ??? or outlaw renegade car dealer ??? dmv will decide for tesla motors

WalletPop EditorWalletPop Editor RSS Feed


Model S. Source: Tesla Motors.The comparisons between automotive stocks and Tesla Motors‘ (NASDAQ: TSLA) lofty valuation continue. But Tesla CEO Elon Musk insists that the company is an automotive tech company — not just an automotive company. Though the claim is odd, Musk is right that Tesla, and the other automotive players, aren’t necessarily driven by the same underlying dynamics. And this is the primary reason so many bears shorting Tesla’s stock continue to miss the point. Particularly, Tesla has three unique factors driving the company forward that other automotive companies can’t count on.

Exclusive Superchargers
Tesla’s charging stations aren’t the typical electric vehicle charging station. On average, Tesla’s Superchargers are about 16 times faster than most public charging stations. In fact, Model S owners can get a 50% battery charge in just 20 minutes at a Supercharging station.


Source: Tesla Motors.

Then there’s Tesla’s aggressive expansion of Superchargers to cover 98% of the U.S. population by 2015. Internationally, Tesla just began opening Superchargers in Europe, and already has 90% of the population covered in Norway.

The combination of faster charging speeds, convenient coverage, and exclusivity, not only sets the foundation for Tesla’s planned mass-market car, but it also gives the company a temporary competitive advantage. In a way, it hedges the company’s ambitious aspirations.

A swappable production strategy
This point is rarely brought up in both bullish and bearish Tesla investment theses, but it’s crucial to the company’s business model. Tesla cars are manufactured in a far different manner than traditional vehicles. They have one standard battery platform on which they can mount varying motors and bodies. Even more, Tesla’s motor is a paltry one-foot in diameter. This swappable production strategy could very well give the company an advantage in achieving production efficiencies.


Tesla battery platform. Source: Tesla Motors.

“When we designed the Model S, we created a platform. So it’s not just a single car; we created something on which we could build many cars, and we are able to leverage that and bring a car to market fast,” Musk explained at the Model X unveiling.

 

Musk has expressed aspirations to eventually achieve gross profit margins that rival Porsche. Before Volkswagen acquired the luxury sports-car maker, Porsche was reporting a gross profit margin of about 50%. Already, Musk says the company should hit its 25% gross profit margin target, excluding zero-emission vehicle credits, by the fourth quarter of 2013.

Capital infusion
Thanks to investor optimism for the stock, Tesla’s $20-billion valuation has infused the company with capital to aggressively invest in Superchargers, production, and international expansion. The valuation itself is a strategic asset to the company. Its $20-billion valuation means that management has even more cash than they had planned for to make necessary investments, or even ramp up production and expansion more rapidly.

Securing the future
All three of these factors are building the foundation for the company’s eventual mass-market affordable car. And each factor helps to secure Tesla’s spot among the big automotive companies — and change the auto industry forever.

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gamechanger??
outlaw renegade car dealer??
cutting edge??
unfair competitive practices??
DMV Investigations will decide
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got1

new rules for BHPH car dealers

 

AB 1534 (Wieckowski)
Vehicles: dealers: used vehicle sales: labeling requirements.

Existing law regulates the accuracy of information provided to consumers during vehicle sales, including the information contained in advertising, brochures, and manuals, as specified.

Existing law also requires manufacturers, as specified, to disclose certain information regarding a vehicles engine, as specified, by affixing a label on the vehicle. A violation of these provisions is an infraction.

This bill requires a licensed dealer, as defined, to affix to and to prominently and conspicuously display a label on any used vehicle offered for retail sale that states the reasonable market value of the vehicle.

The bill requires the label to contain specified information used to determine the vehicles reasonable market value and the date the value was determined.

The bill requires a licensed dealer to provide to a prospective buyer of the used vehicle a copy of any information obtained from a nationally recognized pricing guide that the licensed dealer used to determine the reasonable market value of the vehicle.

The bill requires the label to meet all the following conditions:

 

a)   Be in writing with a heading that reads “REASONABLE

MARKET VALUE OF THIS VEHICLE” in at least 16-point bold

type and text in at least 12-point type.

 

b)   Be located adjacent to the window sticker identifying

the equipment provided with the vehicle, or if none,

located prominently and conspicuously on the vehicle.

 

c)   Contain the information used to determine the reasonable

market value, including, but not limited to, use of a

nationally recognized pricing guide for used vehicles, and

the date the reasonable market value was determined.

 

d)   Indicate that the reasonable market value is being

provided only for comparison shopping and is not the retail

sale price or the advertised price of the vehicle.

 

The bill defines “nationally recognized pricing guide” as including,

but not limited to, the Kelley Blue Book, Edmunds, the Black

Book, or the National Automobile Dealers’ Association (NADA)

Guide.

 

 

 

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do you need a red flag rules template ??? ( ITPP )

Fighting Identity Theft with the Red Flags Rule: A How-To Guide for Business

An estimated nine million Americans have their identities stolen each year. Identity thieves may drain accounts, damage credit, and even put medical treatment at risk. The cost to business — left with unpaid bills racked up by scam artists — can be staggering, too.

The Red Flags Rule1 requires many businesses and organizations to implement a written identity theft prevention program designed to detect the “red flags” of identity theft in their day-to-day operations, take steps to prevent the crime, and mitigate its damage. The bottom line is that a program can help businesses spot suspicious patterns and prevent the costly consequences of identity theft.

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) enforces the Red Flags Rule with several other agencies. This article has tips for organizations under FTC jurisdiction to determine whether they need to design an identity theft prevention program.

Table of Contents

An Overview

Who Must Comply with the Red Flags Rule

FAQs

How To Comply: A Four-Step Process

Endnotes

An Overview

The Red Flags Rule tells you how to develop, implement, and administer an identity theft prevention program. A program must include four basic elements that create a framework to deal with the threat of identity theft.2

  1. A program must include reasonable policies and procedures to identify the red flags of identity theft that may occur in your day-to-day operations. Red Flags are suspicious patterns or practices, or specific activities that indicate the possibility of identity theft.3 For example, if a customer has to provide some form of identification to open an account with your company, an ID that doesn’t look genuine is a “red flag” for your business.
  2. A program must be designed to detect the red flags you’ve identified. If you have identified fake IDs as a red flag, for example, you must have procedures to detect possible fake, forged, or altered identification.
  3. A program must spell out appropriate actions you’ll take take when you detect red flags.
  4. A program must detail how you’ll keep it current to reflect new threats.

Just getting something down on paper won’t reduce the risk of identity theft. That’s why the Red Flags Rule has requirements on how to incorporate your program into the daily operations of your business. Fortunately, the Rule also gives you the flexibility to design a program appropriate for your company — its size and potential risks of identity theft. While some businesses and organizations may need a comprehensive program to address a high risk of identity theft, a streamlined program may be appropriate for businesses facing a low risk.

Securing the data you collect and maintain about customers is important in reducing identity theft. The Red Flags Rule seeks to prevent identity theft, too, by ensuring that your business or organization is on the lookout for the signs that a crook is using someone else’s information, typically to get products or services from you without paying for them. That’s why it’s important to use a one-two punch in the battle against identity theft: implement data security practices that make it harder for crooks to get access to the personal information they use to open or access accounts, and pay attention to the red flags that suggest that fraud may be afoot.

Who Must Comply with the Red Flags Rule: A Two-Part Analysis

The Red Flags Rule requires “financial institutions” and some “creditors” to conduct a periodic risk assessment to determine if they have “covered accounts.” The determination isn’t based on the industry or sector, but rather on whether a business’ activities fall within the relevant definitions. A business must implement a written program only if it has covered accounts.

Financial Institution

The Red Flags Rule defines a “financial institution” as a state or national bank, a state or federal savings and loan association, a mutual savings bank, a state or federal credit union, or a person that, directly or indirectly, holds a transaction account belonging to a consumer.4 While many financial institutions are under the jurisdiction of the federal bank regulatory agencies or other federal agencies, state-chartered credit unions are one category of financial institution under the FTC’s jurisdiction.

Creditor

The Red Flags Rule defines “creditor” based on conduct.5

To determine if your business is a creditor under the Red Flags Rule, ask these questions:

Does my business or organization regularly:

  • defer payment for goods and services or bill customers?
  • grant or arrange credit?
  • participate in the decision to extend, renew, or set the terms of credit?

If you answer:

  • No to all, the Rule does not apply.
  • Yes to one or more, ask:

Does my business or organization regularly and in the ordinary course of business:

  • get or use consumer reports in connection with a credit transaction?
  • give information to credit reporting companies in connection with a credit transaction?
  • advance funds to — or for — someone who must repay them, either with funds or pledged property (excluding incidental expenses in connection with the services you provide to them)?

If you answer:

  • No to all, the Rule does not apply.
  • Yes to one or more, you are a creditor covered by the Rule.

Covered Accounts

If you conclude that your business or organization is a financial institution or a creditor covered by the Rule, you must determine if you have any “covered accounts,” as the Red Flags Rule defines that term. You’ll need to look at existing accounts and new ones6.  Two categories of accounts are covered:

  1. A consumer account for your customers for personal, family, or household purposes that involves or allows multiple payments or transactions.7 Examples are credit card accounts, mortgage loans, automobile loans, checking accounts, and savings accounts.
  2.  “Any other account that a financial institution or creditor offers or maintains for which there is a reasonably foreseeable risk to customers or to the safety and soundness of the financial institution or creditor from identity theft, including financial, operational, compliance, reputation, or litigation risks.”8 Examples include small business accounts, sole proprietorship accounts, or single transaction consumer accounts that may be vulnerable to identity theft. Unlike consumer accounts designed to allow multiple payments or transactions — always considered “covered accounts” under the Rule — other types of accounts are “covered” only if the risk of identity theft is reasonably foreseeable.

In determining if accounts are covered under the second category, consider how they’re opened and accessed. For example, there may be a reasonably foreseeable risk of identity theft in connection with business accounts that can be accessed remotely — say, through the Internet or the telephone. Your risk analysis must consider any actual incidents of identity theft involving accounts like these.

If you don’t have any covered accounts, you don’t need a written program. But business models and services change. You may acquire covered accounts through changes to your business structure, process, or organization. That’s why it’s good policy and practice to conduct a periodic risk assessment.

FAQs

  1. I review credit reports to screen job applicants. Does the Rule apply to my business on this basis alone?No, the Rule does not apply because the use is not “in connection with a credit transaction.”
  2. What if I occasionally get credit reports in connection with credit transactions?According to the Rule, these activities must be done “regularly and in the ordinary course of business.” Isolated conduct does not trigger application of the Rule, but if your business regularly furnishes delinquent account information to a consumer reporting company but no other credit information, that satisfies the “regularly and in the ordinary course of business” prerequisite.

    What is deemed “regularly and in the ordinary course of business” is specific to individual companies. If you get consumer reports or furnish information to a consumer reporting company regularly and in the ordinary course of your particular business, the Rule applies, even if for others in your industry it isn’t a regular practice or part of the ordinary course of business.

  3. I am a professional who bills my clients for services at the end of the month. Am I a creditor just because I allow clients to pay later?No. Deferring payment for goods or services, payment of debt, or the purchase of property or services alone doesn’t constitute “advancing funds” under the Rule.
  4. In my business, I lend money to customers for their purchases. The loans are backed by title to their car. Is this considered “advancing funds”?Yes. Anyone who lends money — like a payday lender or automobile title lender — is covered by the Rule. Their lending activities may make their business attractive targets for identity theft. But deferring the payment of debt or the purchase of property or services alone doesn’t constitute “advancing funds.”
  5. I offer instant credit to my customers and contract with another company to pull credit reports to determine their creditworthiness. No one in our organization ever sees the credit reports. Is my business covered by the Rule?Yes. Your business is — regularly and in the ordinary course of business — using credit reports in connection with a credit transaction. The Rule applies whether your business uses the reports directly or whether a third-party evaluates them for you.
  6. I operate a finance company that helps people buy furniture. Does the Rule apply to my business?Yes. Your company’s financing agreements are considered to be “advancing funds on behalf of a person.”
  7. In my legal practice, I often make copies and pay filing, court, or expert fees for my clients. Am I “advancing funds”?No. This is not the same as a commercial lender making a loan; “advancing funds” does not include paying in advance for fees, materials, or services that are incidental to providing another service that someone requested.
  8. Our company is a “creditor” under the Rule and we have credit and non-credit accounts. Do we have to determine if both types of accounts are “covered accounts”?Yes. You must examine all your accounts to determine which are “covered accounts” that must be included in your written identity theft prevention program.
  9. My business accepts credit cards for payments. Are we covered by the Red Flags Rule on this basis alone?No. Just accepting credit cards as a form of payment does not make you a “creditor” under the Red Flags Rule.
  10. My business isn’t subject to much of a risk that a crook is going to misuse someone’s identity to steal from me, but it does have covered accounts. How should I structure my program?If identity theft isn’t a big risk in your business, complying with the Rule is simple and straightforward. For example, if the risk of identity theft is low, your program might focus on how to respond if you are notified — say, by a customer or a law enforcement officer — that someone’s identity was misused at your business. The Guidelines to the Rule have examples of possible responses. But even a business at low risk needs a written program that is approved either by its board of directors or an appropriate senior employee.

How To Comply: A Four-Step Process

Many companies already have plans and policies to combat identity theft and related fraud. If that’s the case for your business, you’re already on your way to full compliance.

1. Identify Relevant Red Flags

What are “red flags”? They’re the potential patterns, practices, or specific activities indicating the possibility of identity theft.9 Consider:

Risk Factors. Different types of accounts pose different kinds of risk. For example, red flags for deposit accounts may differ from red flags for credit accounts, and those for consumer accounts may differ from those for business accounts. When you are identifying key red flags, think about the types of accounts you offer or maintain; the ways you open covered accounts; how you provide access to those accounts; and what you know about identity theft in your business.

Sources of Red Flags. Consider other sources of information, including the experience of other members of your industry. Technology and criminal techniques change constantly, so it’s important to keep up-to-date on new threats.

Categories of Common Red Flags. Supplement A to the Red Flags Rule lists specific categories of warning signs to consider including in your program. The examples here are one way to think about relevant red flags in the context of your own business.

  • Alerts, Notifications, and Warnings from a Credit Reporting Company. Changes in a credit report or a consumer’s credit activity might signal identity theft:
    • a fraud or active duty alert on a credit report
    • a notice of credit freeze in response to a request for a credit report
    • a notice of address discrepancy provided by a credit reporting company
    • a credit report indicating a pattern inconsistent with the person’s history B for example, an increase in the volume of inquiries or the use of credit, especially on new accounts; an unusual number of recently established credit relationships; or an account that was closed because of an abuse of account privileges
  • Suspicious Documents. Documents can offer hints of identity theft:
    • identification looks altered or forged
    • the person presenting the identification doesn’t look like the photo or match the physical description
    • information on the identification differs from what the person with identification is telling you or doesn’t match a signature card or recent check
    • an application looks like it’s been altered, forged, or torn up and reassembled
  • Personal Identifying Information. Personal identifying information can indicate identity theft:
    • inconsistencies with what you know — for example, an address that doesn’t match the credit report or the use of a Social Security number that’s listed on the Social Security Administration Death Master File
    • inconsistencies in the information a customer has submitted to you
    • an address, phone number, or other personal information already used on an account you know to be fraudulent
    • a bogus address, an address for a mail drop or prison, a phone number that’s invalid, or one that’s associated with a pager or answering service
    • a Social Security number used by someone else opening an account
    • an address or telephone number used by several people opening accounts
    • a person who omits required information on an application and doesn’t respond to notices that the application is incomplete
    • a person who can’t provide authenticating information beyond what’s generally available from a wallet or credit report — for example, someone who can’t answer a challenge question
  • Account Activity. How the account is being used can be a tip-off to identity theft:
    • shortly after you’re notified of a change of address, you’re asked for new or additional credit cards, or to add users to the account
    • a new account used in ways associated with fraud — for example, the customer doesn’t make the first payment, or makes only an initial payment; or most of the available credit is used for cash advances or for jewelry, electronics, or other merchandise easily convertible to cash
    • an account used outside of established patterns — for example, nonpayment when there’s no history of missed payments, a big increase in the use of available credit, or a major change in buying or spending patterns or electronic fund transfers
    • an account that is inactive is used again
    • mail sent to the customer that is returned repeatedly as undeliverable although transactions continue to be conducted on the account
    • information that the customer isn’t receiving an account statement by mail or email
    • information about unauthorized charges on the account
  • Notice from Other Sources. A customer, a victim of identity theft, a law enforcement authority, or someone else may be trying to tell you that an account has been opened or used fraudulently.

2. Detect Red Flags

Sometimes, using identity verification and authentication methods can help you detect red flags. Consider whether your procedures should differ if an identity verification or authentication is taking place in person, by telephone, mail, or online.

  • New accounts. When verifying the identity of the person who is opening a new account, reasonable procedures may include getting a name, address, and identification number and, for in-person verification, checking a current government-issued identification card, like a driver’s license or passport. Depending on the circumstances, you may want to compare that to information you can find out from other sources, like a credit reporting company or data broker, or the Social Security Number Death Master File.10 Asking questions based on information from other sources can be a helpful way to verify someone’s identity.
  • Existing accounts. To detect red flags for existing accounts, your program may include reasonable procedures to confirm the identity of the person you’re dealing with, to monitor transactions, and to verify the validity of change-of-address requests. For online authentication, consider the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council’s guidance on authentication as a starting point.11 It explores the application of multi-factor authentication techniques in high-risk environments, including using passwords, PINs, smart cards, tokens, and biometric identification. Certain types of personal information — like a Social Security number, date of birth, mother’s maiden name, or mailing address — are not reliable authenticators because they’re so easily accessible.

You may be using programs to monitor transactions, identify behavior that indicates the possibility of fraud and identity theft, or validate changes of address. If so, incorporate these tools into your program.

3. Prevent And Mitigate Identity Theft

When you spot a red flag, be prepared to respond appropriately. Your response will depend on the degree of risk posed. It may need to accommodate other legal obligations, like laws about providing and terminating service.

The Guidelines in the Red Flags Rule offer examples of some appropriate responses, including:

  • monitoring a covered account for evidence of identity theft
  • contacting the customer
  • changing passwords, security codes, or other ways to access a covered account
  • closing an existing account
  • reopening an account with a new account number
  • not opening a new account
  • not trying to collect on an account or not selling an account to a debt collector
  • notifying law enforcement
  • determining that no response is warranted under the particular circumstances

The facts of a particular case may warrant using one of these options, several of them, or another response altogether. Consider whether any aggravating factors raise the risk of identity theft. For example, a recent breach that resulted in unauthorized access to a customer’s account records would call for a stepped-up response because the risk of identity theft rises, too.

4. Update The Program

The Rule recognizes that new red flags emerge as technology changes or identity thieves change their tactics, and requires periodic updates to your program. Factor in your own experience with identity theft; changes in how identity thieves operate; new methods to detect, prevent, and mitigate identity theft; changes in the accounts you offer; and changes in your business, like mergers, acquisitions, alliances, joint ventures, and arrangements with service providers.

Administering Your Program

Your Board of Directors — or an appropriate committee of the Board — must approve your initial plan.  If you don’t have a board, someone in senior management must approve it.  The Board may oversee, develop, implement, and administer the program — or it may designate a senior employee to do the job. Responsibilities include assigning specific responsibility for the program’s implementation, reviewing staff reports about compliance with the Rule, and approving important changes to your program.

The Rule requires that you train relevant staff only as “necessary.” Staff who have taken fraud prevention training may not need to be re-trained. Remember that employees at many levels of your organization can play a key role in identity theft deterrence and detection.

In administering your program, monitor the activities of your service providers. If they’re conducting activities covered by the Rule — for example, opening or managing accounts, billing customers, providing customer service, or collecting debts — they must apply the same standards you would if you were performing the tasks yourself. One way to make sure your service providers are taking reasonable steps is to add a provision to your contracts that they have procedures in place to detect red flags and either report them to you or respond appropriately to prevent or mitigate the crime. Other ways to monitor your service providers include giving them a copy of your program, reviewing the red flag policies, or requiring periodic reports about red flags they have detected and their response.

It’s likely that service providers offer the same services to a number of client companies. As a result, the Guidelines are flexible about service providers using their own programs as long as they meet the requirements of the Rule.

The person responsible for your program should report at least annually to your Board of Directors or a designated senior manager. The report should evaluate how effective your program has been in addressing the risk of identity theft; how you’re monitoring the practices of your service providers; significant incidents of identity theft and your response; and recommendations for major changes to the program.12

FTC Resources

Identity Theft
ftc.gov/idtheft

Endnotes

1 The Red Flags Rule was issued in 2007 under Section 114 of the Fair and Accurate Credit Transaction Act of 2003 (FACT Act), Pub. L. 108-159, amending the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), 15 U.S.C. ‘ 1681m(e). The Red Flags Rule is published at 16 C.F.R. ‘ 681.1. See also 72 Fed. Reg. at 63,771 (Nov. 9, 2007). You can find the full text athttp://www.ftc.gov/os/fedreg/2007/november/071109redflags.pdf. The preamble B pages 63,718-63,733 — discusses the purpose, intent, and scope of coverage of the Rule. The text of the FTC rule is at pages 63,771-63,774. The Rule includes Guidelines B Appendix A, pages 63,773-63,774 — intended to help businesses develop and maintain a compliance program. The Supplement to the Guidelines — page 63,774 — provides a list of examples of red flags for businesses and organizations to consider incorporating into their program. This guide does not address companies’ obligations under the Address Discrepancy or the Card Issuer Rule, also contained in the Federal Register with the Red Flags Rule.

The Rule was amended in 2010 by the Red Flag Program Clarification Act of 2010, 15 U.S.C. 1681m(e)(4), Pub. L. 111-319, 124 Stat. 3457 (Dec. 18, 2010).

2 “Identity theft” means a fraud committed or attempted using the identifying information of another person without authority. See 16 C.F.R. ‘ 603.2(a). “Identifying information” means “any name or number that may be used, alone or in conjunction with any other information, to identify a specific person, including any —

(1)           Name, Social Security number, date of birth, official State or government issued driver’s license or identification number, alien registration number, government passport number, employer or taxpayer identification number;

(2)           Unique biometric data, such as fingerprint, voice print, retina or iris image, or other unique physical representation;

(3)           Unique electronic identification number, address, or routing code; or

(4)           Telecommunication identifying information or access device (as defined in 18 U.S.C. 1029(e)).”

See 16 C.F.R. ‘ 603.2(b).

3 See 16 C.F.R. ‘ 681.1(b)(9).

4 The Rule definition of “financial institution” is found in the FCRA. See 15 U.S.C. ‘ 1681a(t). The term “transaction” is defined in section 19(b) of the Federal Reserve Act. See 12 U.S.C. ‘ 461(b)(1)(C). A “transaction account” is a deposit or account from which owners may make payments or transfers to third parties or others. Transaction accounts include checking accounts, negotiable orders of withdrawal accounts, savings deposits subject to automatic transfers, and share draft accounts.

5 “Creditor” and “credit” are defined in the FCRA, see 15 U.S.C. 1681a(r)(5), by reference to section 702 of the Equal Credit Opportunity Act (ECOA), 15 U.S.C. ‘ 1691a. The ECOA defines “credit” as “the right granted by a creditor to a debtor to defer payment of debt or to incur debts and defer its payment or to purchase property or services and defer payment therefor.” 15 U.S.C. ‘ 1691a(d). The ECOA defines “creditor” as “any person who regularly extends, renews, or continues credit; any person who regularly arranges for the extension, renewal, or continuation of credit; or any assignee of any original creditor who participates in the decision to extend, renew, or continue credit.” 15 U.S.C. ‘ 1691a(e). The term “person” means “a natural person, a corporation, government or governmental subdivision or agency, trust, estate, partnership, cooperative, or association.” 15 U.S.C. ‘ 1691a(f). See also Regulation B. 68 Fed. Reg. 13,161 (Mar. 18, 2003).

The Clarification Act has modified the definition of “creditor” however. For purposes of the Red Flags Rule, a creditor —

“A.          means a creditor, as defined in section 702 of the [ECOA], that regularly and in the ordinary course of business—

(i)            obtains or uses consumer reports, directly or indirectly, in connection with a credit transaction;

(ii)           furnishes information to consumer reporting agencies, as described in section 623 [of the FCRA], in connection with a credit transaction; or

(iii)          advances funds to or on behalf of a person, based on an obligation of the person to repay the funds or repayable from specific property pledged by or on behalf of the person;

B.            does not include a creditor … that advances funds on behalf of a person for expenses incidental to a service provided by the creditor to that person.”

6 An “account” is a continuing relationship established by a person with a financial institution or creditor to obtain a product or service for personal, family, household, or business purposes. 16 C.F.R. ‘ 681.1(b)(1).  An account does not include a one-time transaction involving someone who isn’t your customer, such as a withdrawal from an ATM machine.

7 See 16 C.F.R. ‘ 681.1(b)(3)(i).

8 16 C.F.R. ‘ 681.1(b)(3)(ii).

9 See 16 C.F.R. ‘ 681.12(b)(9).

10 The verification procedures are set forth in the Customer Identification Programs Rule applicable to banking institutions, 31 C.F.R. ‘ 103.121. This Rule may be a helpful starting point in developing your program.

11 “Authentication in an Internet Banking Environment” (Oct. 2, 2005) available athttp://www.ffiec.gov/pdf/authentication_guidance.pdf.

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very few are career educators

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some return your phone calls

some only sell bonds

some only sell insurance

some sell car dealer forms

some do income tax preparation

some cancel classes at the last minute

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car dealers…..you must consider paying overtime to your salespersons

 BY LAWRENCE MILES

 

The California Court of Appeal has sided with CarMax in a key decision involving the “sales commission” exemption to California’s overtime law.   In Areso v. Carmax, Inc., the Court held that a pay plan that had a base payment plus “commissions” of about $150 per vehicle sold satisfied the exemption requirements.

California law has a “commissioned sales” exemption to the general overtime statute.  The commissioned sales exemption exempts from the overtime compensation requirement “any employee whose earnings exceed one and one-half (1 1/2) times the minimum wage if more than half of that employee’s compensation represents commissions.”    The case revolved around Labor Code 204.1 which permits California car dealers to pay commission wages once a month, an exception to the general requirement that wages be paid not less than twice a month in California.  Section 204.1 defines “Commission wages” as “compensation paid to any person for services rendered in the sale of such employer’s property or services and based proportionately upon the amount or value thereof.”    The Court wrestled with the question of whether CarMax’s payments to the salesman of about $150 constituted commission wages “based proportionately on the amount or value” of CarMax’s property or services sold.

The employee argued that CarMax’s flat payment made without regard to the price of the vehicle sold did not meet the statutory definition of “commissioned wages,” relying on several cases includingKeyes Motors, Inc. v. Division of Labor Standards Enforcement, 197 Cal. App. 3d 557 (1987) (held: service mechanics not exempt from overtime law).   The employee argued that since the flat payment was made without regard to the value of the vehicle sold, it was not a commission.  The CarMax Court rejected this contention, finding that there was an alternative prong to the test – the amount (number) of the property or services sold by the employee.  The Court further rejected the claim that the flat payment constituted payments for  ”piece work,” observing that the employee was engaged in the “sale of property,” consistent with the statutory requirement.

The Court concluded by noting that the employee’s compensation would rise and fall in direct proportion to the number of vehicles sold, and thus satisfying the commissioned sales exemption to the state’s overtime law.

About Lawrence Miles
Mr. Miles is founding attorney with The Miles Law Firm, A Professional Corporation. The firm practices civil and business law, including extensive work in the auto and aviation industries. For more information, please email Mr. Miles at larry@milesfirm.com or review the Firm’s website.

retro plates are back

Retro license plate proposal on the move

California lawmakers can’t roll back gas prices or revive eight-track tape players, but they soon may offer motorists something else from decades past: replica license plates.

Assembly Bill 1658 would allow the Department of Motor Vehicles to issue plates resembling those of the 1950s, through ’80s for a fee – $50 initially, $40 per year – to cover administrative costs and raise money for environmental projects.

Assemblyman Mike Gatto, a Los Angeles Democrat who proposed the bill, said it capitalizes on nostalgia and recent production of retro-style vehicles. “What’s old is new,” he says, “and it might make the state a little money, too.”

Plates would not be issued by the DMV until 7,500 had been ordered by the public. They would come in three classic designs, with black lettering on a yellow background, or yellow lettering on either a black or blue background.

The new plates would not be exact reproductions, however. Current plates have seven digits, for example, while those of decades past had six. Reflectivity and font-type standards also have changed through the decades.

AB 1658 received bipartisan support in the Assembly Transportation Committee, 14-0, and is awaiting action in the Assembly Appropriations Committee.

farewell my friend

Bucky Harris, former Fresno car dealer of “Noooobody!” renown, dies

BY GEORGE HOSTETTER

The Fresno Bee

 The Fresno auto-dealer who became somebody by trumpeting “nobody” in his sales pitch has died.

Make that “noooobody!”

Norman K. Harris, the one-time owner of Fresno Dodge who was known to most as “Bucky,” died Friday in his sleep at his Fresno home. He was 87.

For more than 40 years, Mr. Harris made his mark in Fresno as a businessman and community leader. But he had barely unpacked his bags after coming to town from Southern California when his public identity changed forever.

Mr. Harris was 43 when, in June 1970, he bought Fresno Dodge Inc. from Sandy Crocket and Max Hessman.

Mr. Harris had no roots in the Valley. He was born in Iowa and had been a top-notch basketball player at Palatine High School near Chicago. He served in the Navy during World War II, got married (Margi, who survives him, was his wife for 64 years), then went to work for Dodge.

But Mr. Harris by the mid-1960s had worked his way up the corporate ladder to be Dodge’s Western area sales manager, so Fresno was no stranger to him.

Selling cars in the Fresno of 1970 was not for the meek. Most dealerships were concentrated in downtown. Fresno Dodge was on Fulton Street. Sierra Chrysler/Plymouth, Dan Day Pontiac and Frontier Chevrolet were a stone’s throw away. Caves Buick and Friendly Ford were a short hop north on Blackstone Avenue.

Dealers fought each other through their advertising. Everyone angled for a branding gimmick to separate their store from the pack. Mack Lazarus in Kerman promised he would “stand on my head” to sell one of his Fords or Ramblers.

If longevity is the yardstick, Mr. Harris came up with the winner. Tall and personable, he stood amid Fresno Dodge’s cars in TV commercials and promised viewers that not a single competitor could beat his bargains.

“Remember,” Mr. Harris said, “that’s nobody but noooobody!”

It took some skill and timing to pull off the “noooobody.” Within a few years Mr. Harris was known as the “nobody but noooobody” man. Then he became “Mr. Nobody.” Finally, in a transformation that shows America’s fondness for nicknames, he became simply Bucky “Nobody” Harris.

Mr. Harris in the mid-1970s said he often received mail addressed to “Mr. Nobody.” Kids tugged his sleeve and insisted he repeat his trademark line. He complied, the only variation being the number of “o”s in the key word’s first syllable.

“I really don’t enjoy making commercials,” Mr. Harris told The Bee in 1974. “It’s a time-consuming thing.”

Mr. Harris had flair to go with his ambition. He added Rolls Royce in 1975 to his dealership’s stable of cars. A business name like “Fresno Dodge-Rolls Royce” probably won’t be seen again.

Mr. Harris in 1989 became the first dealer between Sacramento and Thousand Oaks to sell the Lexus, Toyota’s new luxury car. Mr. Harris promised a few years later to convince Chrysler (owner of Dodge) to send one or two of the automaker’s new Dodge Vipers to Fresno for sale. By early 1993, the first Viper with its 488-cubic-inch, V-10 engine was in town, awaiting seller-buyer negotiations.

Fresno Dodge was sold to Lithia Motors Inc. in 2006. Mr. Harris remained active in business and community affairs.

Fresno and its car-selling industry changed greatly over the past 43 years. Many of the new-car dealerships moved north. Blackstone near downtown remains a center for car sales, but the vehicles generally are trade-ins.

The industry’s one constant is fierce competition.

Mr. Harris some 40 years ago explained why he took the time and effort to make sure Fresno Dodge TV commercials had the perfect “noooobody!” at the end.

“The response,” Mr. Harris said, “has been tremendous.”

Norman K. ‘Bucky’ Harris

Born: Jan. 22, 1926

Died: Sept. 27, 2013

Occupation: Auto dealer

Survivors: Wife Margi Harris; sons Tim and wife Leanne Harris, Bill and wife Susy Harris and John and wife Kina Harris; daughters Patti and husband Mike Carey, Suzy and husband Ben Ewell; 16 grandchildren; and one great-grandchild.

Services: Funeral Mass will be celebrated at 10 a.m. today at Holy Spirit Catholic Church, 355 E. Champlain Drive, Fresno. Donations may be made to Nancy Hinds Hospice or Holy Spirit Catholic Church.

The reporter can be reached at (559) 441-6272 or ghostetter@fresnobee.com. Read his City Beat blog at news.fresnobeehive.com/city-beat.

autopia

retro license plates may make a revival

Retro license plate proposal on the move

California lawmakers can’t roll back gas prices or revive eight-track tape players, but they soon may offer motorists something else from decades past: replica license plates.

Assembly Bill 1658 would allow the Department of Motor Vehicles to issue plates resembling those of the 1950s, through ’80s for a fee – $50 initially, $40 per year – to cover administrative costs and raise money for environmental projects.

Assemblyman Mike Gatto, a Los Angeles Democrat who proposed the bill, said it capitalizes on nostalgia and recent production of retro-style vehicles. “What’s old is new,” he says, “and it might make the state a little money, too.”

Plates would not be issued by the DMV until 7,500 had been ordered by the public. They would come in three classic designs, with black lettering on a yellow background, or yellow lettering on either a black or blue background.

The new plates would not be exact reproductions, however. Current plates have seven digits, for example, while those of decades past had six. Reflectivity and font-type standards also have changed through the decades.

AB 1658 received bipartisan support in the Assembly Transportation Committee, 14-0, and is awaiting action in the Assembly Appropriations Committee.

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every car dealer must present a pot of gold to the dmv

we call the dealer surety bond

a pretty pot of gold that

you must create and present to the dmv

it is a promise to three agencies of state government

the bond has a 12 month coverage period

with a three year claims period

for example:

2014 sales are covered thru 2017

by posting a bond you promise to:

always pay the dmv for fees and penalties

always pay the board of equalization its sales tax

honor all judicial orders for repayment

if you break your promise

the agency exercises your bond

the bond company makes payment to the agency

and you must make immediate repayment to the bond company

old school dealers have posted cash or savings

with a 3 year hold after you close the business

new school rents the money from the bond company

with the bond preminum based on the collective credit of the owners

wholesale only dealers with 24 sales per year or less can post a $ 10k bond

with preminums starting @ $ 300 per year

wholesale dealers above 24 sales per year or retail dealers

must post a $ 50k bond

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CA Lic. # 0702245

 

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BABYSITTER: Slang term used for a co-signer or co-buyer on an automobile contract; often used where the primary buyer needs help to make a decision or make the buy.

BACK END: Back end is the contract which is being sent to the bank for financing, where extra “hidden” profit is made by the dealer; the back end profit occurs because the dealer gets a kickback from the bank just for setting up the loan there instead of somewhere else.

BACK OUT THE DEAL: See meaning of Unwind.

BEATER: See SLED.

BE BACK: Prospective buyer who has been in the dealership once or several times. Did not buy at that time and has returned for additional information or whatever.

car salesmanBIRD DOG: One who refers prospective customers to a particular dealership or salesman for a given fee or compensation.

BOUNCE: To bounce someone means to increase the sales price of the car, interest rate, monthly payments, etc.

BRICKS: This term is used to refer to one’s house as security in taking out a second trust deed loan.

BROWNIE: To sell a car to a customer as a result of going around and putting a piece of paper with a message like “call me regarding your car” on car windows on the street.

BUMP: See BOUNCE.

BUREAU: A credit report on a customer.

BUY RATE: This is the interest rate that banks or financing institutions will charge on all contracts being financed. It is a “secret” number between the lender and the dealer which is the real amount of the interest rate that the loan starts out at before the dealer increases it for its own extra profit.

A BUYBACK: a vehicle that the manufacturer bought back, usually because it was a lemon, and then was resold, often through a car dealer auction where it can be recycled back into the marketplace, often without disclosure of its true history of defects, also, see laundered lemon.

CANDY STORE : A dealership with lots of vehicle inventory.

CASH THE DEAL: This means that a third party lender has accepted the finance contract assignment from the dealer and paid the dealer for it. The dealer has their money and this is usually the point of no return as far as the dealer is concerned, i.e., the dealer will most often refuse to unwind the deal.

CHASSIS: The frame of a vehicle, may or may not include the engine as part of it, depending on the chassis manufacturer and its construction process.

CHISLER: A buyer who constantly grinds the salesman to the best possible deal that he can get.

CLIMBER: A salesman who can sell anything to anyone. One who is able to tackle a tough customer and knock them over.

CLOSER: Usually a pushy salesman whose job it is to “close” the deal with the customer when the customer hesitates when dealing with the salesman.

COLD CANVAS: A form of prospecting where a salesman or dealership solicits any and all prospective buyers in any given area.

COME ON: This is where the buyer is led to believe one thing and it turns out to be really something else.

DE-HORSE: This is when you take a customer out of his trade-in and let him temporarily drive a borrowed car from the dealership until his purchase is completed.

DESK: The floor manager’s central location. It literally is an office location that is typically on the show room floor and glass walled so the Desk Man (the manager) can see everything that is going on. From here the manager controls every deal being worked on. Sales staff go to the Desk to get approval on every aspect of the deal. The Desk controls the payment quotes, the price, the down payment and trade in terms. See Tower.

DESKMAN or DESK: A man who both figures and determines what kind of deal the dealership will make to a customer. He is in charge of all financial aspects of every deal and charged with the responsibility of maximizing the dealer profit.

DEUCE: This usually refers to a $200.00 figure for whatever reason, down payment, trade-in value, etc.

DIP: This is when the customer needs additional or all of his cash down advanced by a finance company.

DOORMAN: The name given to the dealer employee who stands at the doorway of the finance manager office, blocking it, when the buyer is sitting in the F&I office and the final paperwork is being signed, an intimidation tactic often used by the salesperson on the deal or the floor manager when the dealer knows there is something in the transaction that the customer does not know or understand and may object to.

DOUBLE DIP: To finance purchase between two or more loan companies.

DOWN: Short form for down payment. Also used when a salesman is finished talking to a prospective buyer. He is considered to be down and the next salesman is considered to be up and in line to handle the next prospective buyer.

DOWN STROKE: Means customer’s down payment.

EDGY: This is a customer who may or may not be able to get his car financed.

EIGHTY FIVE FIFTY FIVE, 8550: This is the GM paint code for black paint. It is sometimes used by a dealer to refer to the race of a prospective buyer as a slang term. It may also occur with other franchised dealers using their manufacturer paint code for the color black.

ETCH, ETCH-A-SKETCH: Often called theft guard or a similar term, it is a soft add on product promoted as a product that will reduce the chance of a vehicle being stolen, to apply it the dealer uses a chemical that eats, or etches, into one or more glass windows a series of numbers that the dealer claims can enable police to find the owner of the car if they recover it after it was stolen, usually sold for hundreds of dollars by a car dealer, the product itself can be found on the internet as a self-installed kit that will cost about $20, the window etch scheme makes maximum car dealer profit at little cost and some say etch gives little or no real benefit to the consumer.

ETHER: Is a slang term used in association with its actual application. For example, putting someone in the ether. This is usually done in a closing situation and the customer is not completely aware of what is happening.

EYE BALLER: Is a flashy looking, bright colored, usually a sporty type automobile.

F and I: Stands for finance and insurance and refers to the sales department that arranges for financing a sale with a third party lender such as a bank or credit union, etc. The department is actually little more than a person who performs the task and who is often called the F and I Manager or Business Manager, even their job is to primarily to sell the customer on the idea of letting the dealer set up their financing and also to sell the customer the soft add on products.This is where most dealers make their highest profit margin.

Five Finger Close: A technique used by some car dealers to get the sales papers signed by the consumer without the consumer realizing that the numbers on the papers have been increased above what was orally discussed with the consumer, such as, the dealership Finance Manager holds the stack of sales papers still with one hand planted in the middle of the top document while pointing to the signature line with the other hand and asking the buyer to just sign here and here and here, etc., using their hand to cover up an area of the sales document where numbers appear that the dealer does not want the buyer to see. Then the dealer sets that sales paper aside and puts another one in front of the consumer and again puts one hand in the middle of the page while pointing to the next signature line with the other hand. The process is repeated through all the sales documents so that the buyer does not realize that the sales figures were changed on the earlier document, in other words, the repetitive routine disguises the fraud that earlier occurred in the process. It appears to the consumer that the Finance Manager is being helpful in holding the page still but in reality the technique is used to deceive the customer into believing that the numbers, such as the price, etc, are the same as what was talked about earlier when, in reality, they are not. It is sometimes also called a five finger spread or five finger push.

Five Finger Fold: Similar to the five finger close. It is another technique used to get the sales papers signed without the consumer knowing that the numbers on the papers have been changed. In this tactic the Finance Manager holds the stack of sales papers still with one hand planted in the middle of the top document while pointing to the signature line with the other hand and asking the buyer to just sign here and here, etc., thus using their hand to cover up the area of the document where the numbers appear that the dealer does not want the buyer to spot. As each individual sales paper is signed, the dealer folds up the bottom edge where it was signed, revealing the next page and the customer is again asked to sign. The process is repeated through all the documents being signed. It appears to the consumer that the Finance Manager is being helpful in holding the page still but in reality they are using the technique to deceive the customer into believing that the numbers, such as the price, etc, are the same as what was talked about earlier when, in reality, they are not. Sometimes called a five finger spread or five finger push.

FLAKE: Is a customer who usually has bad credit, little or no money down. It is usually a waste of time trying to put a deal together for him.

FLIP: This is to convert a buyer from financing his automobile through his own bank or credit union to financing through the dealership.

FLUFF & BUFF: This is where a used car is superficially cleaned up quickly, removing any evidence of the identity of the prior owner such as the original factory new car owner manual and warranty and any repair records in the vehicle, then the dealer puts it out on the dealership used car lot for sale.

FULL BORE: To sell a car for the full sticker price with no discount.

GOLD BALLS: One who has excellent credit and usually a considerable down payment.

GRAPE: This is a very easy buyer. He normally goes along with anything anyone tells him.

GREEN PEA: This is a new salesman or sales business manager.

GRINDER: This is a buyer who, no matter what the salesman offers, wants more for less.

HEAT SHEET: A document in the sales paperwork that the dealer has the customer initial, usually along the right margin, which says that the customer has been made aware of a long list of specific disclosures and disclaimers, many of which may not have taken place at all. Then when the buyer later discovers an act of dealer fraud and returns to complain, the dealer will pull out the Heat Sheet and point to where the buyer signed or initialed saying that the act did not occur or they were informed, etc. In other words, like a heat sink used in soldering metals, the Heat Sheet takes the buyer complaint and neutralizes it.

HEN: Older type salesman who influences younger salesmen (adversely).

HIGH BALL: A figure given to a prospective customer which is an inflated value of his trade-in in order to get the customer to return to the dealership to purchase his new car.

HIGH PENNY: To adjust a customer’s monthly payment. For example: from $101.13 to $101.93. It is safe to assume that if the customer will pay $101.13 for a car payment, he will pay $101.93 without giving it a second thought.

HIGH PENNY ROLL: is where the finance sales person’s computer is rigged to automatically increase, i.e., roll up, numbers in the transaction to a higher number without tipping it to a dollar increase. Doing this on every transaction can create $20,000 to $40,000 of extra profit a year since it adds 1 to 98 cents to every payment. Also called High Penny or Penny Pumping.

HOME RUN: When maximum profit has been made on a deal or when the sales business manager has sold the customer all the insurance he has available.

HOPE DEAL: The phrase used by a car dealer to describe a sale that they do not know will be financed by a third party lender but hope to make it work by pulling in favors at the lender to get the financing approved by the lender.

HOUSE: When the dealership itself, also called the store; alternative: when referring to a recreational vehicle it is the portion of the RV above the chassis itself and is also called the box.

IRON: This is an old used car valued at nothing more than the price of iron.

KINK: A problem with a deal due to “miswriting”, misrepresentation, misquoting, or mishandling.

LAID AWAY: A customer who has paid the maximum price for as many items (like accessories, rust proofing, extended warranty, financing and credit insurance) as can possibly be sold on an automobile.

LAND THE CUSTOMER: This is when the sales person has identified the type of vehicle the buyer is looking for and found it and has gotten the buyer’s attention fixed on purchasing that specific vehicle, such as they have landed the customer on the iron.

LAY DOWN: This is a customer who says yes to everything. They “lay down” and get run right over.

LAUNDERED LEMON: When a car is bought back by the manufacturer and then resold without disclosure that it was bought back under the lemon law, thus hiding its defect history from subsequent owners, it is generally an illegal practice.

LEG as in “giving Leg.” Means getting a leg up on the buyer. Describes the sales person quoting an inflated and false proposed monthly payment number to the buyer in order to lock them in on a false number in order to leave room for the finance sales person to pack into the deal additional profit-making products for the dealership, whether or not the customer knows it is happening to them. See Payment Packing.

LINER: A salesman whose responsibility is to land a customer on one particular vehicle, get a commitment of some type from the customer regardless of how ridiculous it is, and then turn the customer over to his T.O. person, the sales manager or mother.

LOADING THE PAYMENT: means to take the normal monthly payment amount and load it up by falsely inflating it to a higher than necessary number in order to leave room for the finance sales person to pack into the deal added profit-making products for the dealership which the buyer may not even know about. See Payment Packing.

LOT LIZARD: A the sales people who stand around outdoors on the car lot, usually in small groups of two or three, waiting for a customer to come along so they can pounce on them to make a sale.

LOW BALL: This is a sales figure or tenative price given to a customer who has acknowledged the fact that he is not going to purchase an automobile at this time and wants to shop this figure against other dealerships. This is normally an unrealistically low figure and one that the automobile can not actually be purchased for.

MICKEY: Slang term used to describe a down payment loan that is arranged by the dealership. This is referred to as completing a deal in Mickey Mouse way.

MOTHER: See T.O. MAN.

MOUSE HOUSE: Slang term used for a finance company.

NEGATIVE EQUITY: Negative equity means that your trade-in vehicle has a fair market value that is less than what you owe on it. This could be because you have not owned it very long and you still owe a very high payoff on it. It could also be because the last dealership you traded a car in, and who sold you this one, started you on this “negative equity” cycle. Click here for more information about Negative Equity Car Dealer Scams.

NICKEL: Refers to $500.00 for either trade value, purchase price, cash down, etc.

PACK: this has two applications. First, it is used to describe the overhead deduction from the sales person’s commission. The dealer will deduct anywhere from $100 to $700 from the gross profit of the deal and pay the salesman his commission which is figured on the difference. The dealership (also called the house) calls the deduction a dealer pack but it is really just a way of reducing the commission the sales person has earned in a deal. In the second use of the term, it is used in relation to payment packing, which is where the sales person quotes a higher than necessary monthly payment number to the buyer in order to overcome objections when the finance sales person jacks up the payment even more because they are adding into the deal, with or without the buyer knowing it, soft add on products like Etch or extended warranties, etc. For example, the sales person knows that the normal monthly payment amount might be $275 but they deliberately tell the buyer that it will be $325 so that there is $50 of room for the finance sales person to pack the deal with added-cost soft add on products.

PAYMENT PACKING: where the sales person quotes a higher than necessary monthly payment number to the buyer in order to overcome objections when the finance sales person jacks up the payment even more because they are adding into the deal, with or without the buyer knowing it, soft add on products like Etch or extended warranties, etc. For example, the sales person knows that the normal monthly payment amount might be $275 but they deliberately tell the buyer that it will be $325 so that there is $50 of room for the finance sales person to pack the deal with added-cost soft add on products. A more deceptive way of payment packing is to get the buyer to agree on a monthly payment number without the buyer knowing the loan length. That way the finance sales person can create more profit in the deal by simply upping the loan length without the buyer even realizing that the overall cost to the buyer is higher than it otherwise would be.

PENCIL: This has two applications. First, a sales manager will pencil a salesman’s deal by crossing out the customer’s offer and penciling in the figure that he wants to get for that car. The second application is used when a salesman or sales manager changes the selling price or trade-in allowance and covers it up with an increase in the customer’s monthly payment because of the additional cost he expects to pay for Credit Life, Accident and Health Insurance.

PIPE SMOKER: A customer who smokes a pipe, gives no commitments whatsoever, usually grinds the salesman to his last thread and doesn’t buy the car after all.

PUT TOGETHER: This means much the same as “laying someone away”. In other words the maximum gross profit to be made on that deal was accomplished.

RATE SHEET : The Dealer Reserve Schedule used by F & I salesperson to determine the amount of the kickback they will get from the bank or other lender who is going to finance the sale, in exchange for bumping the interest rate up above the minimum rate that the lender actually wants to get on the loan.

RESERVE: Sometimes thought of as a “kickback” the bank gives the dealer for setting up the loan. The income a dealership realized on a contract in excess of the finance source’s discount rate. For example: If the bank is going to charge $600.00 in finance charges on a given contract and the total finance charge to the customer on this contract is $1,000.00, the dealership will realize $400 in “reserve money” but the customer thinks the interest is all being charged by the bank.

RESIDUAL: This is the termination value of an automobile that is being leased. The number on the lease contract may be real or simply made up.

ROLL BACK: To work a deal backwards. Instead of working with the purchase price and trying to determine a monthly payment, you would start with a known monthly payment and try to determine a selling price. It also means to “roll back” the odometer on a car to make it worth more money – highly illegal.

ROLL TERM: As in to Roll the Term. It means to stretch the buyer’s loan out to a longer term without telling the buyer that it is happening in order to keep the monthly payment inside the buyer’s target while still increasing the dealer’s profit in the deal.

RULE OF 78: A mathematical formula used in figuring a rebate of unearned charges or premium, when these charges were pre-computed and pre-paid. Once referred to as “78 ways we get to keep your money”.

SEALING THE CUSTOMER: Means the customer sales paperwork has been signed and put in an envelope which was licked and sealed and put in their hand, usually with the dealer sales person telling them that the envelope contains important sales papers that the customer should take home and put in a safe place. If the dealer has packed the deal with soft add on products that the buyer does not know about, doing this detracts from the fraud since it discourages the buyer from looking at the numbers to make sure they are what the sales person said they would be. If the dealer staples the envelope, it may mean that the dealer is definitely trying to hide something printed on the sales papers by making it more difficult for the papers to be removed without tearing them, usually right in the spot where the false number is typed.

SERVICE LANE WALK: Describes the activity of a dealer salesperson trying to sell replacement vehicles, new or used, to people who have brought their vehicle into the service department for repair work to be done.

SHADOW: What a green pea does to lean how senior salespeople sell, i.e., they follow them around and observe.

SHOUT OUT: When the customer commits to the buy, the salesman loudly announces, sometimes on the dealer’s public address system, that “[buyer's name] has just purchased a [year make model Rv vehicle]” (that is the “shout out” moment) which is followed by immediate applause from all the other sales persons in the showroom, a tactic to solidify the buyer’s commitment to the sale, often used in slasher sales.

SIGNED, SEALED AND DELIVERED: Generally means the same thing as SEALING THE CUSTOMER.

SLASHER: Slang job title for highly aggressive temporary sales person or sales staff that a dealer brings in to stage a quick sales event, usually over a weekend, with the specific purpose of selling vehicles that have been sitting on the dealer lot (called stale inventory) for more than the normal number of days unsold; this type of sales team is usually flown in from out of state and typically is made up only of very strong (see term definition below) and pushy and aggressive sales people whose sole objective is to make sales happen one way or another.

SLED: Reference quite often given to a customer’s old trade-in which is usually “beat up” and worth little or nothing.

SLIDE RULER: A buyer who is a specification nut. He does not deal in generalizations when prices are quoted. They must be exact and justified most of the time. This buyer will have a slide ruler or a pocket calculator with him to calculate his own sales tax and total sales price.

SOBRE: Spanish word which generally means the same thing as SEALING THE CUSTOMER when the customer is of Hispanic heritage.

SOFT ADD ON: This refers to the items sold by the F&I Manager which increase the overall vehicle transaction price to the consumer but add no hard value to the goods being sold, which is why they are called soft add on items. They typically include such things as service contracts, Etch, disability insurance, wheel protectant, Gap insurance, etc. Many times these additional items are preprinted on the sales and financing forms. This is where most dealers make their biggest profit margins in a deal.

SPEAR: Think of it like in the movies when the Indian would “spear” a fish in the stream for his dinner. This is just a method used in getting a customer onto a dealer’s lot. For example: Stopping a man on the street and telling him that you would give him some outrageous figures for his trade-in if he would just come down to the dealership today and take a look at what you have to offer.

SPIFF: A bonus paid to a sales person as an extra reward for selling a particular vehicle. It may be paid by the dealership itself or, in the case of a new vehicle, by the vehicle manufacturer. Often is between $50 and $250 but the amount will vary.

SPOT DELIVERY: This is when all phases of the purchase and delivery are completed the same day and a few days or so later the dealer calls the customer back and claims they have to sign a new finance contract or put more money down or that the lender requires the buyer to get a service contract or extended warranty in order to get loan approval, etc. It may or may not be true. It sometimes is used by a dealer to strong arm the buyer into buying more soft add on products in the deal. Sometimes this is also called a Yo Yo.

STALE: This refers to a vehicle on the dealer lot that the dealer thinks has been sitting unsold for too long.

STICKS: Reference given to the borrower’s furniture he puts up as collateral on a small loan, such as when he borrows the money for the down payment on the car he is getting ready to buy.

STRAW PURCHASE: This is when a third party buys an automobile and finances it in his name for some else (who will be the actual driver) because of that other person’s age, bad credit, or lack of credit, etc.

STROKER: An individual who gives the impression that he wants to buy a car, but really doesn’t have the means to do so.

STRONG: This word has two possible meanings. When used in reference to an automobile, it indicates that the car is a good seller and therefore, an above average profit can normally be made on it so the dealer can get away with charging a premium price, often above the sticker price or other normal market value. The second application would refer to a sales individual, be it salesman, sales manager, Sales Business Manager, a closer, etc, and means their ability to be aggressive and pushy to make a sale happen when the customer is wavering or doubtful of the deal being offered.

STUD: See second application of STRONG.

“SUM OF THE DIGITS”: Another term used for the “RULE OF 78″ – a formula used in figuring refunds or rebates of money paid for a soft add on product like insurance or etching, sometimes referred to as “78 ways we get to keep your money”.

SWITCH: To change a customer from buying one car to another for several reasons: availability, possible profit, etc.

THIRD BASEMAN: An individual who accompanies a prospective buyer because the buyer feels he is better versed in haggling over the price of the car and/or knows more about the car mechanically, thereby decreasing the chances of getting stuck with a “lemon”.

TIRE KICKER: This is normally an individual who doesn’t want to buy a car, but just wants to look. He walks in, touches the merchandise and doesn’t want to talk to anyone.

T.O. (TURNOVER): The procedure used in selling where the salesman or liner turns a prospective buyer over to another salesman or sales manager to close the sale.

T.O. MAN: This is the individual to whom a LINER will turn a customer over.

TOAD: Reference given to a customer’s trade-in; a worn-out piece of machinery that is just “sitting there” like a toad.

TOWER: the floor manager’s central location. It literally is an office location that is typically on the show room floor and glass walled so the manager can see everything that is going on. From here the manager controls every deal being worked on. Sales staff go to the tower to get approval on every aspect of the deal. The tower controls the payment quotes, the price, the down payment and trade in terms.

UNWIND THE DEAL: To cancel a vehicle sale or lease like it never happened at all, i.e., the dealer takes back the vehicle and may or may not refund the customer down payment or give back the customer trade in vehicle. The dealer may or may not have a legal basis to unwind the deal. But universally dealers do not want to do it.

UP: This refers to the prospective buyer and is a generic terms for any potential customer.

YO YO DEAL: This is when all phases of the purchase and delivery are completed the same day and a few days or so later the dealer calls the customer back and claims they have to sign a new finance contract or put more money down or that the lender requires the buyer to get a service contract or extended warranty in order to get loan approval, etc. It may or may not be true. It sometimes is used by a dealer to strong arm the buyer into buying more soft add on products in the deal. Sometimes this is also called a Spot Delivery

 

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Be-back: A customer who leaves the car lot promising to return later, saying, “I’ll be back,” or some variation of that statement. “The guy was a be-back. But I think he meant it. I’ll see him again.”

Bumping: Raising the customer’s offer for a car. “If Mr. Customer says he only wants to pay $250 a month, just say, ‘Up to — ?’ He’ll probably bump himself up to $300 without you doing anything.”

“Buyers are liars”: Car salesmen know they have a reputation for dishonesty. But they counter with this claim of their own.

Salesman #1:After the test-drive, this guy tells me he has to leave ’cause he’s got a doctor’s appointment. Yeah, right.”

Salesman #2:“What can I tell you, man? Buyers are liars.”

Closer: An experienced salesman who is brought in to “close” the customer by making them agree to a deal. “If I worked with a better closer, I’d have more units on the board.”

Demo: This is the test-drive. “This guy comes in, demos the car, and I think he’s ready to buy, right? Then he tells me the car’s for his wife and he can’t make a decision without her. Same old line.”

F&I: This stands for the Finance and Insurance office where the documents are signed. The F&I salesperson usually will push products such as extended warranties, fabric protection and alarms. “The wait for F&I is two hours. Better stick with your customer so they don’t skip out the back door.”

“The feel of the wheel will seal the deal”: It is assumed that if you test-drive a car, you will buy it. “This prospect was on the fence, right? I get him in the car, he drives the thing, now he’s hot to buy. It’s like they always say, ‘The feel of the wheel will seal the deal.'”

First pencil: This is the opening offer from the sales manager, usually written onto the four-square worksheet, so-called because it is highly negotiable, i.e. written in pencil, not ink. “I show my customer the first pencil and it’s so high he nearly dies. I scrape him off the ceiling and make a deal.”

Four-square: As negotiations begin, the salesman pulls out a worksheet divided into four squares which represent the four elements of a car deal: selling price, trade-in value, monthly payment and down payment. “I started working the four-square and looked up at the prospect. It was great — they had no idea what the hell I was talking about.”

Full pop lease: This is when a vehicle is leased at 110 percent of the sticker price — the highest amount allowed by most banks. “I got them into a full pop lease. I’ll get a nice voucher for that.”

GM: The general manager. The GM is the head honcho at the dealership. He runs the business from day to day. “The guys were standing out on the curb drinking coffee so the GM called them into the tower and read them the riot act.”

Green pea: A new car salesperson. “The funny thing is, green peas can outsell the veterans. That’s because they don’t know how hard this job is.”

Grinder: A customer who negotiates for hours over a small amount of money. “We were only $100 apart, but the guy wouldn’t sign. Man, what a grinder.”

Home run: This applies when a salesman has taken advantage of every element of the deal: trade-in, sale price and financing. “I stole their trade and buried them in a full pop lease with 9.9 percent financing. Home runs like that don’t come along everyday.”

Lay down (Also “Lie down” depending on usage): A customer who takes whatever deal the salesperson offers. “I quoted him monthly payments of $575 and he took it! I wish all the customers were lay downs like that.”

Mini: The commission on a deal where the car was sold at close to invoice price. “Sure, the deal was only a mini. But I qualified for a weekend bonus and made a grand.”

Mooch: A customer who wants to buy a car at invoice. “People are spending too much time on the Internet reading invoice prices. It’s turning them into a bunch of mooches.”

Packing payments: Adding extra profit to the cost of a car. “This place I used to work got busted for packing payments. Bummer. But it was great while it lasted.”

The Point: The place on the car lot where the “up” man stands looking for customers. “The GM saw me standing on the point with my hands in my pockets. He went ballistic and sent me home for the day.”

Pounder: A deal with a $1,000 profit in it. “Doctor comes in and buys the top-of-the-line model, fully loaded — and he pays sticker! That’ll be a two-pounder for me.”

“Rip their heads off”: This describes taking a customer to the cleaners. “I sold them this fully loaded, top-of-the-line model at a grand over sticker — I mean, I just ripped their heads off.”

Roach: A customer with bad credit. Not to be confused with the “roach coach” (see entry below).“The guy looked good. But we ran his credit, and he turned out to be a roach. We’re talkin’ a 400 credit score, repos and bankruptcies out the wazoo.”

Roach coach: The food truck that comes around to the dealership everyday. “I shouldn’ta eaten that chili from the roach coach. My stomach’s killin’ me.”

Spiff: A tip, kickback or payment of any kind, usually cash which is handed between salespeople.“I spiffed the F&I guy $20 bucks, and he took my customers first.”

Strong: This has a special meaning on the car lot. It means holding firm on your price and being a tough negotiator. “When they ask for your price, you have to be strong. Hit ‘em with high payments, then scrape them off the ceiling and start negotiating.”(See also “weak.”)

Tower: The office where the sales managers work. This is usually a raised platform allowing the managers to see over the roofs of the cars so they can watch customers and their salespeople.“Attention: All new car salesmen report to the new car tower!”

Turn over: Also known as “turning,” this is the practice of passing a customer from one salesman to another. It is thought that this will prevent customers from leaving the car lot. The theory is that the customer might just have bad chemistry with the first salesman and he might like the next salesman. “I turned this guy to my partner and he wound up buying. I’ll get half of the commission on the deal.”

Up: A customer who walks onto the car lot. The term probably comes from the order in which customers are taken, as in: “Who’s up next?” “There are customers all over the lot — looks like the ups bus just arrived.”

Voucher: Car salespeople receive a voucher to let them know what their commission was for selling a car. They don’t know until the deal is finalized exactly how much they will receive. “Check out this voucher. I thought I had a pounder. Instead it’s a mini.”

Weak: This describes being a weak negotiator or coming down too quickly on price. “The guy was weak so he only lasted a few months. How are you going to make money in this business if you give away cars?”

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By Damon LowneyRSS feedGoogle+

Months after the confusing announcement of Tesla’s lease-like financing program, the electric vehicle maker could face an advertisement probe that has been requested by the California New Car Dealers Association,Automotive News reports, which claims that consumers are being mislead by advertised monthly payments that are lower than what most people would experience.

The ordeal can be traced back to April 2, when Tesla made an announcement specifying tiered monthly payments for the three versions of the Model S assuming a 66-month term. But then Tesla revised the numbers upward overnight because, it claimed, it meant to say it offered a 63-month finance term, not a 66-month term. The automaker also claimed that factoring in the “true cost of ownership” of a Model S compared to a conventional fuel-burning car could drive monthly costs to below $500.

In May, it added an available finance term of 72 months, which, factoring in only gasoline savings, the company said could lower monthly payments to $580. But the underlying issue at hand is that the means which can potentially lower monthly payments from $1,000+ dollars (depending on the model) to under $600 can’t be realized by the majority of Americans, the CNCDA says.

Tesla provides an online calculator that does the payment math for you. It takes into account the $7,500 federal incentive and $2,500 California incentive (state incentives differ) for EVs, what your time is worth, how much time and money are saved away from the gas station, shortened commuting time with carpool lane access (in participating states), and even business tax benefits. But the “packed external incentives,” as the dealer association calls them, don’t apply to everybody. Most people can’t realize monthly payments below $500 unless they have the right mix of true-cost-of-ownership deductions. CNCDA also claims that only 20-percent of Americans can claim the full $7,500 federal incentive, which is based on findings by the Congressional Budget Office, according to Automotive News.

Brian Maas, president of the dealer association, sees Tesla’s advertisement strategy in this way: “It’s misleading. If you checked every box on their true cost of ownership series of inquiries, they claim you can get a Model S for $114 a month, which is lower than the cheapest [new] car available in the United States, the Nissan Versa – which would cost you, with a lease deal, about $139 a month,” Automotive News reports.

 

 

does tesla have to obey the car dealer rules ???

This week, a trade group representing California’s new-car dealers urged the state Department of Motor Vehicles to launch an investigation into the way that Tesla Motors (TSLA) markets its all-electric Model S sedan, arguing that the Palo Alto-based company inflates the benefits of its financing option on its website.

But Tesla is fighting back, saying Thursday that the complaint, which Tesla says is without merit, needs to be viewed in a broader, national context: Car dealer associations across the country are trying to block Tesla’s progress, as the Palo Alto-based company takes market share from other brands.

Major automakers sell their cars through franchised dealerships; Tesla sells the Model S directly to consumers through its own stores. That’s earned Tesla the wrath of dealers, who have succeeded in barring Tesla from selling directly to consumers in Texas.

“There are state dealer associations in all 50 states, and a national dealer’s association. They would have you believe there is no coordinated activity,” Diarmuid O’Connell, Tesla’s vice president of business and corporate development, said in an interview Wednesday. “It’s incredible to believe that in all the conference calls that there isn’t a coordinated effort to retard our progress either in selling directly to consumers or slowing our sales. We are taking market share away from other brands in the California market. I believe there is coordinated activity.”

Denying the charge, Charles Cyrill, a spokesman for the National Automobile Dealers Association, said Wednesday that “this is a state issue that is being debated in the states.”

The California New Car Dealers Association, which represents 1,100 new car and truck dealers, in a nine-page letter Monday asked the state DMV to look at Tesla’s advertising practices.

Its claims about the monthly finance payment for the Model S “is both misleading and illegal,” Brian Maas, president of the California New Car Dealers Association, said in a statement.

Tesla does not advertise in the traditional sense, but has a self-service calculator on its website where consumers can enter information about how valuable their time is and the length of their commute.

Jan Mendoza, a representative for the California DMV, said Wednesday that the agency “receives complaints from the public and other entities and may investigate issues under its legal authority if warranted.”

The state dealers association’s August newsletter included sales figures through June 2013 that show that Tesla sold

more cars in California than established brands like Cadillac, Jaguar and Porsche. The group’s letter to the DMV came three weeks later.

 

Tesla sold 12,351 Model S sedans through August; California is thought to account for roughly half of all sales.

Contact Dana Hull at 408-920-2706. Follow her at Twitter.com/danahull.

 

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“Buy-Here-Pay-Here” Car Dealers.   

Two new laws are directed at used car dealers that assign less than 90 percent of their conditional sales and lease contracts to third party lenders; and therefore provide direct financing to car buyers.  One of the new laws defines these used car dealers as “buy-here-pay-here” dealers.

AB 1447 further prohibits these dealers from requiring buyers to make payments in person, except for the down payment, and limits the circumstances under which “buy-here-pay-here” dealers may track a vehicle using electronic tracking technology (GPS tracking).   “Buy-here-pay-here” used car dealers will not be allowed to disable a vehicle with starter interrupt technology without first notifying the buyer in writing at the time of sale.  In addition, “buy-here-pay here” used car dealers will be required to provide a 30-day or 1,000 mile warranty as part of any purchase or lease of a used vehicle.  (AB 1447/Feuer)

AB 1534 requires “buy-here-pay-here” used car dealers to affix and prominently display a label on any used vehicle offered for retail sale that provides the reasonable market value of the vehicle.   The label must contain specific information from a recognized pricing guide used to determine that value and the date the value was determined.   The prospective purchaser must also be provided with a copy of the information that the dealer used to determine the vehicle’s value.  (AB 1534/Wieckowski)

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what is a car dealer bond exactly ???

DMV Motor Vehicle Dealer Bond

Bond Amount

$50,000

Requiring Entity

State of California Department of Motor Vehicles

Underwriting Criteria

Personal credit check and personal financial statements for all business owners

Who is Required to Secure this Bond

Under California Vehicle Code 11710 (CVC 11710) all applicants for a dealer or remanufacturer license are required to procure and file a bond with the Department of Motor Vehicles. The bond must be executed by an admitted surety, as approved to by the Attorney General. The dealer bond must be in the amount of $50,000, unless the dealer deals exclusively in motorcycles or all-terrain vehicles and wholesale dealers who sell fewer than 25 cars per year (CVC 11710.1)

Bond Requirement Specifics

Under California Vehicle Code 11710 (CVC 11710) all applicants for a dealer or remanufacturer license are required to procure and file a bond with the Department of Motor Vehicles. The bond must be executed by an admitted surety, as approved to by the Attorney General. The dealer bond must be in the amount of $50,000, unless the dealer deals exclusively in motorcycles or all-terrain vehicles and wholesale dealers who sell fewer than 25 cars per year (CVC 11710.1) The liability of the bond must remain at full value at all times. If the bond amount is decreased or if there is an outstanding court judgment again the dealer, remanufacturer or surety, the license will be automatically suspended. In order to reinstate the license, the licensee must file an additional bond or restore the bond to the original amount, or terminate the outstanding judgment or which the dealer, remanufacturer or sureties are liable (CVC 11710).

Who is protected Under this Bond

Purchaser, sellers, financing agencies or governmental agencies in the State of California are entitled to make a claim against the dealer’s surety bond should the dealer act in violation of the California Vehicle Code. Upon validation of the claim, the beneficiary is entitled to monetary damages which the surety bond would cover. The bond guarantees that individuals granted a license or permit to operate a business or to exercise a privilege will meet the obligations under that license or permit.

Underwriting Process

Each applicant must first complete and submit the application for a Motor Vehicle Dealer, which contains all of the pertinent information regarding the business and business owners. Upon receipt of the application, our agency will be able to provide a response as to rate and approval for the Motor Vehicle Dealer bond within one business day. Once the application is approved, the bond will be executed and released to the applicant upon receipt of payment.

What you Need to do Once you have your Bond

Once the Motor Vehicle Dealer bond has been approved and released to the applicant’s care, it must be filed with the Department of Motor Vehicles along with the licensing paperwork. The Department of Motor Vehicles will maintain the bond, which must remain effective at all times to prevent any suspension of the Motor Vehicle Dealer license.

Obligee Link

http://www.dmv.ca.gov/vehindustry/ol/olbranch_top.htm 

can you explain the purpose of a car dealer bond ???

+++

a car dealer license surety bond

is a promise you make

to the government

and the bonding company

that

you are a person of honor

you will meet your obligations

and never leave unpaid bills as a car dealer

+++

the bond company is obligated to pay claims

when you fail with your obligations

common car dealer bond claims:

failure to pay collected sales tax

failure to pay collected dmv fees

failure to pay another dealer

failure to honor a court order

+++

the bond company evaluates each claim

and has 30 days to decide if the claim is valid

if deemed vaild

you, the car dealer who has been bonded

must repay the bond company

upon their payment of a successful claim

+++

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no car dealer license plates

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Mike

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just what is a car dealer license surety bond ???

+++

a car dealer license surety bond

is a promise you make

to the government

and the bonding company

that

you are a person of honor

you will meet your obligations

and never leave unpaid bills as a car dealer

+++

the bond company is obligated to pay claims

when you fail with your obligations

common car dealer bond claims:

failure to pay collected sales tax

failure to pay collected dmv fees

failure to pay another dealer

failure to honor a court order

+++

the bond company evaluates each claim

and has 30 days to decide if the claim is valid

if deemed vaild

you, the car dealer who has been bonded

must repay the bond company

upon their payment of a successful claim

+++

no bond

no car dealer license

no car dealer license plates

+++

we make it simple for you

EZDealerBond.com

+++

call me for a quote today

714-797-5780

Mike

+++

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we are the leaders in

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in response to high demand

we are now offering a spanish language car dealer class

in modesto at crows landing for those who prefer a spanish teacher

we offer a downloadable spanish handbook after the class

Click here for Crows Landing class dates

you may call the instructor direct

Jorge Elizalde

El Tio Auto Sales

209-538-1789

got1

Auto Broker Training

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LEARN HOW TO BECOME A LICENSED AUTO BROKER

gotplates.com

800-901-5950

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Autobroker s Endorsement

An autobroker’s endorsement requires payment of fees as required by subdivision (d) of Section 9262 of the California Vehicle Code.

A dealer may not engage in brokering a retail sales transaction without having an autobroker’s endorsement to their dealer’s license.

Upon issuance of an autobroker’s endorsement to a dealer’s license, the department shall furnish the dealer with an autobroker’s log.  The autobroker’s log remains the property of the department and may be taken at any time for inspection.

The autobroker’s log must contain the following information with respect to each retail sale brokered by that dealer:

  • Vehicle identification number of brokered vehicle
  • Date of brokering agreement
  • Selling dealer’s name, address, and dealer number
  • Name of consumer
  • Brokering dealer’s name, address, and dealer number (CVC Section 11735)

A dealer who brokers a motor vehicle sale shall deposit directly into a trust account any purchase money, including purchase deposits, it receives from a consumer or a consumer’s lender.

  • All trust accounts required by CVC Section 11737 shall be maintained at a branch of a bank, savings and loan association, or credit union regulated by the state or the government of the United States.

+++

+++

 

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#1 STOP SHOP for DEALER SUPPLIES Inside the Office to make the Deal and Outside to Enhance your Customer Street Appeal! Increase your sales with our sales products including Banners, Pennants, Balloons, Rear View Mirror Tags, Windshield Markers of All Sizes, a wide variety of Colors and Sizes in Adhesive Numbers as well as slogans with up to date statements. We also supply your service department with Seat Covers, Floor mats, Keyboards, Key tags, and many other items.

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we now can offer a car dealer class in spanish

we are the leaders in

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in response to high demand

we are now offering a spanish language car dealer class

in modesto at crows landing for those who prefer a spanish teacher

we offer a downloadable spanish handbook after the class

Click here for Crows Landing class dates

you may call the instructor direct

Jorge Elizalde

El Tio Auto Sales

209-538-1789

got1

got dealer news ???

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

To subscribe to the e-mail alert service logon to www.emailalert.dmv.ca.gov/subscriptions.asp.

This page contains detailed instructions on how to subscribe.
The Industry Tools Home Page located at

http://www.dmv.ca.gov/vr/dealer_regservice.htm

provides convenient access to information and links that are pertinent to the vehicle registration industry.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

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we make it simple for you

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we can help you contact california dmv investigations

DMV Contacts

The Department of Motor Vehicles – Investigations Division is geographically organized into 3 Regions; Northern, Central, and Southern. Consisting of 9 Area Commands with 26 district supervisors directly supervising 26 district offices and 11 satellite offices. 

 

In addition, the Department has an internal investigations unit tasked with investigating allegations of employee misconduct. The Special Operations Command is located in Sacramento with 4 district supervisors directly supervising 3 district offices and 1 technical services unit.

 

It is the responsibility of the Area Commander to monitor division programs and services provided to the public. The Area Commander directs services through the Supervising Investigator at the district level.

 

Supervising Investigators oversee complex criminal, administrative, and civil investigations conducted by sworn investigators of the department involving

 

In the performance of their duties and under the general oversight of the Area Commander, DMV Supervising Investigators and Investigators investigate the following types of crimes:

 

  • Unlicensed dealer activity;
  • Unlicensed dismantler activity;
  • Identity theft;
  • Financial fraud;
  • Fraudulent and counterfeit DMV documents;
  • Vehicle identification and Odometer fraud;
  • Vehicle industry fraud (consumer fraud);
  • DMV related high tech computer crimes; and
  • Internal investigations.

 

 

To further investigations, DMV Investigators utilize some investigative techniques such as:

 

  • Participate in surveillance and undercover operations;
  • Prepare and serve search and arrest warrants;
  • Testify as expert witnesses; and
  • Work in cooperation with local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies.

 

 

INVESTIGATIONS DIVISION GEOGRAPHIC JURISDICTION

 

 

The Area Commander’s report to a Deputy Chief for each region.

 

Region I – Northern California

Lisa McMillan, Deputy Chief

2120 Broadway MS-215

Sacramento, CA 95818

Phone: (916) 657-5983

Fax: (916) 657-8350

 

Region I – Northern consists of the Bay, Central and Northern Area Commands.

 

The Bay Area Command has four Investigative District Offices which are located in Brisbane and Milpitas (three).  Please refer to DMV website at www.dmv.ca.gov for a listing of the office addresses and phone numbers.  To write or contact the Bay Area Commander:

 

Region I – Bay Area Command

Lisa Martinez, Area Commander

860 Hillview Court, Suite 100

Milpitas, CA 95035

Phone: TBD

Fax: TBD

The Central Area Command has three Investigative District Offices, which are located in Fresno, Bakersfield and Stockton. Please refer to DMV website at www.dmv.ca.gov for a listing of the office addresses and phone numbers.  To write or contact the Central Area Commander:

 

Region I – Central Area Command

Tom Wilson, Area Commander

2510 S. East Avenue, Suite 100B

Fresno, CA 93706

Phone: (559) 444-2529

Fax: (559) 444-2530

 

 

The Northern Area Command has three Investigative District Offices which are located in Rocklin, Sacramento and Vallejo. Please refer to DMV website at www.dmv.ca.gov for a listing of the office addresses and phone numbers.  To write or contact the Northern Area Commander:

 

 

Region I – Northern Area Command

Mary Bienko, Area Commander

4240 Rocklin Road #11

Rocklin, CA 95677

Phone: (916) 630-5616

Fax: (916) 630-5600

 

 

 

Region II Southern California

Vacant, Deputy Chief

750 The City Drive, Suite 200

Orange, CA 92868

Phone: (714) 703-4108

Fax: (714) 703-4138

 

Region II Southern consists of the Inland, Orange and Southern Area Commands.

 

The Inland Area Command has two Investigative District Offices, which are located in Riverside.  Please refer to DMV website at www.dmv.ca.gov for a listing of the office addresses and phone numbers.  To write or contact the Inland Area Commander:

 

Region II – Inland Area Command

Gregory Huber, Area Commander

6296 River Crest Drive, Suite A

Riverside, CA 92507

Phone: (951) 697-4546

Fax: (951) 656- 4671

 

The Orange Area Command has two Investigative District Offices, which are located in Orange, CA.  Please refer to DMV website at www.dmv.ca.gov for a listing of the office addresses and phone numbers.  To write or contact the Orange Area Commander:

 

Region II – Orange Area Command

Elizabeth Devellerez, Area Commander

750 The City Drive, Suite 200

Orange, CA 92868

Phone: (714) 703-4100

Fax: (714) 703-4128

 

The Southern Area Command has three Investigative District Offices, which are located in San Diego (two) and Chula Vista. Please refer to DMV website at www.dmv.ca.gov for a listing of the office addresses and phone numbers.  To write or contact the Southern Area Commander:

 

Region II – Southern Area Command

Theodora Claudio, Area Commander

2878 Camino Del Rio South #310

San Diego, CA 92108

Phone: (619) 767-2355

Fax: (619) 491-3070

 

 

Region III Central California

Vito Scattaglia, Deputy Chief

14400 Van Nuys Blvd.,

Arleta, CA 91331

Phone: (818) 686-3417

Fax: (818) 899-5896

 

Region III Central consists of the Midland, Pacific and Valley Area Commands.

 

The Midland Area Command has three Investigative District Offices, which are located in El Monte, Los Angeles, and West Covina.  Please refer to DMV website at www.dmv.ca.gov for a listing of the office addresses and phone numbers.  To write or contact the Midland Area Commander:

 

Region III – Midland Area Command

Eugene Devellerez, Area Commander

3204 Rosemead Boulevard #204

El Monte, CA 91731

Phone: (626) 927-1094

Fax: (626) 927-1097

 

 

The Pacific Area Command has three Investigative District Offices, which are located in Artesia (two) and Culver City. Please refer to DMV website at www.dmv.ca.gov for a listing of the office addresses and phone numbers.  To write or contact the Pacific Area Commander:

 

Region III – Pacific Area Command

Stephanie Wheaton, Area Commander

621 N. La Brea Avenue

Inglewood, CA 90302

Phone: (310) 412-6111

Fax: (310) 412-6443

 

The Valley Area Command has three Investigative District Offices, which are located in Lincoln Park, Mission Hills, and Ventura.  Please refer to DMV website at www.dmv.ca.gov for a listing of the office addresses and phone numbers.  To write or contact the Valley Area Commander:

 

Region III – Valley Area Command

Paula Lucero, Area Commander

15455 San Fernando Mission Blvd., #305

Mission Hills, CA 91345

Phone: (818) 365-4202

Fax: (818) 361-7351

 

 

SPECIAL OPERATIONS COMMAND

 

The Special Operations Command has three Investigative District Offices, which are located in Sacramento, West Covina, and Riverside. Please refer to DMV website at www.dmv.ca.govfor a listing of the office addresses and phone numbers. To write or contact the Special Operations Commander;

 

Special Operations Command

Lilia Duarte, Area Commander

2120 Broadway, MS N215

Sacramento, CA 95818

Phone: (916) 657-7094

Fax: (916) 657-8350

#1cardealerschool @gotplates

DMV Dealer Education Providers

Dealer education providers are listed by the type of class offered and area served. All classes are held in a classroom unless noted in the first column.

*Pre-licensing only
**Continuing Education only
DMV has not approved any “on-line” Pre-Licensing Programs

Area and
Type of Class Offered
Online/Home Study Continuing Education title  title Northern Area title Central Area title Southern Area title Provider

X

X

X

X

X

TriStar Motors, LLC
Phone: 1–800–901–5950
Internet: www.gotplates.com

X

X

X

X

X

24–7 Dealer Training Specialists
Phone: 1–951–833–8398
Internet: www.24–7dealerclass.com

X

X

California Auto Dealer Education
Phone: 1–661–871–3311
Internet: www.cadeclasses.com

X

Central Valley Dealers Licensing Renewal Service
Licensing Renewal Service
Phone: 1–209–333–0900
Email: chuckwentland@aol.com

X

Superior Vehicle Dealer Training Institute
Phone: 1–949–305–8402
Internet: www.superiorbonds.com

X

X

Inland Empire/Orange County Dealer School
Phone: 1–909–648–0446
Internet: www.bigcardealer.com

X

X

X

Dealer Training Experts of Northern California
Phone: 1–408–910–3876
Internet: www.dealersclass.com

X

X

X

X

X

Dealer Intel
Phone: 1-415-613-4754
Internet: www.dealerintel.com

X

X

X

X

X

$85 Dealer Education
Phone: 1-951-541-8390
Internet: www.waynesinsurance.com
X

X

X

X

Los Angeles Dealer School
Phone: 1-310-227-6920
Internet: www.dealerclass.com

*X

Dealer License Seminars of San Diego
Phone: 1-619-665-6440
Internet: www.dealerseminars.com
X X

X

X

X

Golden State Educational Services
Phone: 1-916-470-4384
Internet: www.goldenstateeducation.com

X

X

X

X

X

Dealer Education Services
Phone: 1-888-323-0031
Internet: www.dealereducation.com

X

X

Coffer Dealer Education
Phone: 1-888-694-1444
Internet: www.cofferdealereducation.com

X

Cesar Carrascos Dealer Licensing Seminars
Phone: 1-619-474-0477
Internet: www.carrascogroup.com

X

X

Dealers Support Group
Phone: 1-818-758-9951
Internet: www.dealerssupport.com
X X California Accredited Dealer Education
Phone: (714) 300-4148
Email:: cadeclass@aol.com
X X X X X ATG Dealer School
Phone: 1-818-909-7912
Internet: www.atgdealerschool.com
*X Bell’s Automotive Dealer
Phone: 1-909-202-9204
Email: bell2automotive@yahoo.com

**X

Auto Support Group
Phone: 1-714-588-1511
Email: E2000perez@yahoo.com
X X Dealer Lessons
Phone: 1-877-772-3332
Internet: www.dealerlessons.com
X Online Auto Dealer Ed
Phone: 1-877-724-6150
Internet: www.onlineautodealered.com
X Colby Learning Center of San Diego
Phone: 1-619-559-5748
Email: colbylearning@aol.com
X X Modesto/Central Valley Dealer Education
Phone: 1-209-535-8910

X

Best Solutions
Phone: 1-619-546-4064

X

X

X

X

X

Motorsports Market On-Line Courses, Live Classes and Home Study
Phone: 1-800-980-1967
Internet: www.motorsportsmarket.com

X

A-1 Dealers Support Group
Phone: 1–323–781–7130
Internet: www.a1autodealerssg.com

X

X

X

X

X

Automotive Systems Analysis
Phone: 1–800–564–0984
Internet: www.autosystemsanalysis.com

X

X

X

X

X

FFW Auto Group
Phone: 1–415–644–8052
Internet: www.ffwautogroup.com

Last updated: 07/08/2014

dmv certified car dealer schools

DMV Dealer Education Providers

Dealer education providers are listed by the type of class offered and area served. All classes are held in a classroom unless noted in the first column.

*Pre-licensing only
**Continuing Education only
DMV has not approved any “on-line” Pre-Licensing Programs

Area and
Type of Class Offered
Online/Home Study Continuing Education title  title Northern Area title Central Area title Southern Area title Provider

X

X

X

X

X

TriStar Motors, LLC
Phone: 1–800–901–5950
Internet: www.gotplates.com

X

X

X

X

X

24–7 Dealer Training Specialists
Phone: 1–951–833–8398
Internet: www.24–7dealerclass.com

X

X

California Auto Dealer Education
Phone: 1–661–871–3311
Internet: www.cadeclasses.com

X

Central Valley Dealers Licensing Renewal Service
Licensing Renewal Service
Phone: 1–209–333–0900
Email: chuckwentland@aol.com

X

Superior Vehicle Dealer Training Institute
Phone: 1–949–305–8402
Internet: www.superiorbonds.com

X

X

Inland Empire/Orange County Dealer School
Phone: 1–909–648–0446
Internet: www.bigcardealer.com

X

X

X

Dealer Training Experts of Northern California
Phone: 1–408–910–3876
Internet: www.dealersclass.com

X

X

X

X

X

Dealer Intel
Phone: 1-415-613-4754
Internet: www.dealerintel.com

X

X

X

X

X

$85 Dealer Education
Phone: 1-951-541-8390
Internet: www.waynesinsurance.com
X

X

X

X

Los Angeles Dealer School
Phone: 1-310-227-6920
Internet: www.dealerclass.com

*X

Dealer License Seminars of San Diego
Phone: 1-619-665-6440
Internet: www.dealerseminars.com
X X

X

X

X

Golden State Educational Services
Phone: 1-916-470-4384
Internet: www.goldenstateeducation.com

X

X

X

X

X

Dealer Education Services
Phone: 1-888-323-0031
Internet: www.dealereducation.com

X

X

Coffer Dealer Education
Phone: 1-888-694-1444
Internet: www.cofferdealereducation.com

X

Cesar Carrascos Dealer Licensing Seminars
Phone: 1-619-474-0477
Internet: www.carrascogroup.com

X

X

Dealers Support Group
Phone: 1-818-758-9951
Internet: www.dealerssupport.com
X X California Accredited Dealer Education
Phone: (714) 300-4148
Email:: cadeclass@aol.com
X X X X X ATG Dealer School
Phone: 1-818-909-7912
Internet: www.atgdealerschool.com
*X Bell’s Automotive Dealer
Phone: 1-909-202-9204
Email: bell2automotive@yahoo.com

**X

Auto Support Group
Phone: 1-714-588-1511
Email: E2000perez@yahoo.com
X X Dealer Lessons
Phone: 1-877-772-3332
Internet: www.dealerlessons.com
X Online Auto Dealer Ed
Phone: 1-877-724-6150
Internet: www.onlineautodealered.com
X Colby Learning Center of San Diego
Phone: 1-619-559-5748
Email: colbylearning@aol.com
X X Modesto/Central Valley Dealer Education
Phone: 1-209-535-8910

X

Best Solutions
Phone: 1-619-546-4064

X

X

X

X

X

Motorsports Market On-Line Courses, Live Classes and Home Study
Phone: 1-800-980-1967
Internet: www.motorsportsmarket.com

X

A-1 Dealers Support Group
Phone: 1–323–781–7130
Internet: www.a1autodealerssg.com

X

X

X

X

X

Automotive Systems Analysis
Phone: 1–800–564–0984
Internet: www.autosystemsanalysis.com

X

X

X

X

X

FFW Auto Group
Phone: 1–415–644–8052
Internet: www.ffwautogroup.com

Last updated: 07/08/2014

meet the electric car guru from palo alto ca

Electric car enthusiasts are a passionate bunch.

We’ve seen as much from reading the comments on Green Car Reports articles, and suspect more than a few of our readers have helped change the opinions of friends, family and co-workers on electric cars. Maybe they’ve even tested or bought one as a result.

“EV evangelist” Sven Thesen has done just that, and more besides–showing that spreading the word on electric cars starts with the individual.

In a podcast interview with IEEE Spectrum, Thesen revealed how he’s spread the news of electric cars through his neighborhood, to companies he’s worked for, and even helped others to go through their own discovery process with electric cars.

It all started when Thesen worked at Pacific Gas and Electric Company in the early 2000s.

When researching replacements for a diesel irrigation pump in the central valley, he discovered just how much cleaner an electric pump was over every metric–no local emissions, tiny CO2 footprint, much greater efficiency and an increasingly clean grid to power it. From that point, he realized that electric power could do the same for the transport sector.

Initially, he got PG&E to take on a plug-in hybrid as part of its mainly natural gas-powered fleet. They said yes, and became one of the first utilities to use such a vehicle.

He later joined Better Place, which unfortunately proved to be a dead end thanks to its troubles, but continued his electric vehicle activism in day to day life, too.

One of the first moves was to install an electric car charging point on the curb outside his house. This can be used by anyone who wants to use it, and free of charge–though plenty of happy EV owners have send thank-you notes and even delivered small presents as a mark of gratitude.

While the permit took a while to acquire–the charger is on city land, of course–Thesen says it’s been hugely successful so far, with regular usage and a positive reception from neighbors.

He’s used the experience of his own charger to help others install curbside chargers, and perhaps streamline the application and planning processes.

And one of the biggest successes under Thesen’s belt was getting Palo Alto to pass a city ordinance to install wiring for a charger in every new home. It means every new house in Palo Alto–around a hundred are built each year–will already have the required wiring for a charger, reducing the cost of installation should the new owner want to buy an electric car.

The same could happen for new parking lots, and the ideas in Palo Alto could spread elsewhere too.

And remember: This is all the work of one man.

With passion for a topic, some good ideas and a heap of determination, it’s amazing what can be achieved.

new california investigative unit to hunt for tax evaders

Governor Signs AB576

October 09, 2013

New Enforcement Effort Will Target Tax Evaders

It is estimated that tax cheaters and evaders in California are ripping off the state by billions of dollars a year, but legislation signed into law by Governor Jerry Brown this week, will work to change that.

Assembly Bill 576 provides for a new investigation and enforcement effort that will include California Statewide Law Enforcement Association (CSLEA) members who are investigators with the Employment Development Department (EDD), the Franchise Tax Board (FTB), and the Department of Justice (DOJ) all working with the Board of Equalization (BOE).

“These people and businesses making money, yet fudging numbers to avoid taxes and fees, or not reporting all together, hurt our economy, ” said CSLEA President Alan Barcelona.  “That’s money that could be used for public safety, consumer protection, public schools and other state services.”

AB 576 will create a centralized intelligence partnership to be known as the Revenue Recovery and Collaborative Enforcement Team until January 1, 2019.

 

sacramento #realcardealerschool

imagine a car dealer school

taught by real car dealers

we are the only ones with a

retail / autobroker car dealer license

who actually teach

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we are not attorneys

we are not selling forms

we are not bond agents

we do not sell insurance

we have no software for you

learn how to get licensed from the

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classes in:

SACRAMENTO

FAIRFIELD

NOVATO

FREMONT

MODESTO

PLEASANTON

SANTA ROSA

SAN MATEO

CLOVIS

SALINAS

SANTA CRUZ

CITRUS HEIGHTS

LOS BANOS

LOS GATOS

FRESNO

CROWS LANDING

CAMPBELL

SAN JOSE

WALNUT CREEK

SAN FRANCISCO

STOCKTON

UKIAH

gotplates.com

800-901-5950

redstar

autopia

 

get licensed with auction access and dealer plates

we estimate your wholesale home based part time car dealer license expenses:

your car dealer bond $ 300.

your car dealer training $ 150.

your car dealer insurance $ 1800.

your car dealer license $ 150.

your car dealer plates $ 150.

your car dealer forms $ 200.

your car dealer office expenses $ 500.

your car dealer auction access $ 100.

your car dealer checking account $ 250.

get licensed with our car dealer school

gotplates.com

redstar

800-901-5950

 

do you have experience in the car business ???

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we have openings for qualified teachers

we run the largest car dealer school in america

we are certified by the california dmv since 1998

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the retail side of this business is complex

the wholesale side could not be more simple

teaching car dealer school can be fun and exciting

we deal with over 50 cultures in california

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we teach old scholl business principles

honor your obligations

treat customers well

respect yourself and your staff

making money can be fun and exciting

+++++

if you are interested

we will need a resume and a background check

please call Charlotte today

800-901-5950

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jody car dealer forms

+++

Optional Products and Services

Disclosure

$29.99

The dealer must provide this document disclosing the cost of specified items purchased and the effect of those items on installment payments. (Civil Code §2982.2)
  • Model: JF682
  • 949-837-4088

car dealer forms starter kit

 

red flag rules revisions for car dealers offering credit

car dealers offering credit of any form are required to be red flag compliant as of jan 2011

dmv inspectors are now checking for car dealers offering credit to be red flag compliant

here are the new red flag rule guidelines from the FTC:

Revised red flag rules for july 2013

our red flag compliance program cost is $ 500.

Click here to sign up now

car dealer nurse

is autobroker advertising allowed ???

yes and no
you may advertise your broker services
but not access to specific vehicles
you could reference vehicles advertised by retail dealers
with whom you have a brokering agreement
we allow that for vehicles placed on retail consignment
our drafted sale program costs 425. per vehicle
with red flag certification
you may show cars consigned to retailers
but you must negotiate and complete the sale
at the retail dealer holding that vehicle in its inventory
hope that makes sense
you have to be very careful
if you are not a licensed retailer yourself
the brokering agreement you hold may enable some advertising
under the retail dealers license
thx
Joseph
800-901-5950
+++
thx

cal ag privacy unit to begin car dealer red flag rules enforcement

SACRAMENTO – Attorney General Kamala D. Harris today announced the creation of the Privacy Enforcement and Protection Unit in the Department of Justice which will focus on protecting consumer and individual privacy through civil prosecution of state and federal privacy laws.

“In the 21st Century, we share and store our most sensitive personal information on phones, computers and even the cloud. It is imperative that consumers are empowered to understand how these innovations use personal information so that we can all make informed choices about what information we want to share,” said Attorney General Harris. “The Privacy Unit will police the privacy practices of individuals and organizations to hold accountable those who misuse technology to invade the privacy of others.”

The California Constitution guarantees all people the inalienable right to privacy. The Privacy Unit will protect this constitutionally-guaranteed right by prosecuting violations of California and federal privacy laws. The Privacy Unit centralizes existing Justice Department efforts to protect privacy, including enforcing privacy laws, educating consumers and forging partnerships with industry and innovators.

The Privacy Unit’s mission to enforce and protect privacy is broad. It will enforce laws regulating the collection, retention, disclosure, and destruction of private or sensitive information by individuals, organizations, and the government. This includes laws relating to cyber privacy, health privacy, financial privacy, identity theft, government records and data breaches. By combining the various privacy functions of the Department of Justice into a single enforcement and education unit with privacy expertise, California will be better equipped to enforce state privacy laws and protect citizens’ privacy rights.

The Privacy Unit will reside in the eCrime Unit and will be staffed by Department of Justice employees, including six prosecutors who will concentrate on privacy enforcement. Joanne McNabb, formerly of the California Office of Privacy Protection, will serve as the Director of Privacy Education and Policy, and will oversee the Privacy Unit’s education and outreach efforts.

Protecting the privacy of Californians is one of Attorney General Harris’s top priorities. The creation of the Privacy Enforcement and Protection Unit follows the forging of an industry agreement among the nation’s leading mobile and social application platforms to improve privacy protections for consumers around the globe who use apps on their smartphones, tablets, and other electronic devices. The platform companies who signed on to that agreement — Amazon.com Inc., Apple Inc., Facebook, Google Inc., Hewlett-Packard Company, Microsoft Corporation and Research in Motion Limited — agreed to privacy principles designed to bring the industry in line with California law requiring apps that collect personal information to post a privacy policy and to promote transparency in the privacy practices of apps.

Attorney General Harris established the eCrime Unit in 2011 to prosecute identity theft, data intrusions, and crimes involving the use of technology. The eCrime Unit provides investigative and prosecutorial support to the five California regional high-tech task forces funded through the High Technology Theft Apprehension and Prosecution Trust Fund Program and provides coordination for out-of-state technology-crime investigation requests. The eCrime Unit also develops and provides training for law enforcement officers, prosecutors, the judiciary and the public on cyber safety and the importance of strong information-security practices.

The February 2012 press release announcing the apps agreement can be found here:http://oag.ca.gov/news/press-releases/attorney-general-kamala-d-harris-secures-global-agreement-strengthen-privacy

The June 2012 press release announcing that Facebook joined the apps agreement can be found here: http://oag.ca.gov/news/press-releases/attorney-general-kamala-d-harris-announces-expansion-california%E2%80%99s-consumer

The December 2011 press release announcing the creation of the eCrime Unit can be found here: http://oag.ca.gov/news/press-releases/attorney-general-kamala-d-harris-announces-creation-ecrime-unit-targeting

# # #

car dealer application help from the DMV

+++

The purpose of this pamphlet is to inform the prospective vehicle dealer applicant of the requirements to obtain
a license from the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) and provides detailed information and instructions in
completing and submitting your application.

+++

HOW TO USE THIS PAMPHLET

+++

We have tried to arrange this book in much the same order you should follow in establishing your business. In
addition, to assist you, we’ve created check lists (New Dealer Application, OL 249A or Used Dealer and Autobroker,
OL 249B or Dealer-Wholesale Only, OL 248C) listing the items required when submitting your application to the
department. These check lists may be downloaded from our website at www.dmv.ca.gov.

+++

DMV ADVISORY STATEMENT

The information required on the attached forms pertain to eligibility for issuance of an occupational license. It is
required under authority of Division 5 of the California Vehicle Code. Failure to provide the information is cause for
refusal to issue an occupational license.

+++

Application information is public record, regularly used by law enforcement agencies, and is open to inspection by
the public. Some information contained in these records is classiied as conidential or personal pursuant to the
Information Practices Act of 1977 and the Public Records Act and is exempt from disclosure. Individuals are entitled
to inspect or obtain copies of information contained in their record during regular office hours.
The Deputy Director of the Licensing Operations Division,

2570 24th Street, Sacramento, CA. 95818,

is responsible
for maintaining record information.

+++

DEALER DEFINED

Section 285 of the California Vehicle Code (CVC) deines a dealer who:
(a) For commission, money, or other thing of value, sells, exchanges, buys or offers for sale, negotiates or attempts
to negotiate, a sale or exchange of an interest in a vehicle subject to registration or a motorcycle, snowmobile,
subject to identiication under this code, or induces or attempts to induce any person to buy or exchange an
interest in a vehicle and, who receives or expects to receive a commission, money brokerage fees, proit, or any
other thing of value, from either the seller or purchaser of said vehicle; or
(b) Is engaged wholly or in part in the business of selling vehicles or buying or taking in trade, vehicles for the
purpose of resale, selling, or offering for sale, or consigned to be sold, or otherwise dealing in vehicles, whether
or not such vehicles are owned by the person.

+++

BACKGROUND INVESTIGATION

A background investigation is conducted on all applicants and disclosure of a conviction may result in a temporary
operating permit not being issued.
Failure to disclose any and all convictions may result in the refusal, denial, or revocation of your license.
Pursuant to CVC Section 11703, the department may refuse to issue a license to any applicant who has been
convicted of a crime or committed any act or engaged in any conduct involving moral turpitude which is substantially
related to the qualiications, functions, or duties of the licensed activity.
A plea of nolo contendere is a conviction within the meaning of this section. In addition, Article 4 and Article 6.1
of Title 13, of the California Code of Regulations (CCR) provide guidelines used by the department in determining
whether a license should be issued.

+++

THE FEE SCHEDULE IS:
$175.00 Nonrefundable original application fee.
$ 1.00 Family Support Program fee.
$100.00 Autobroker (plus original application fee).
$ 70.00 For each branch location (if applicable).
$225.00 New Motor Vehicle Board Fee
Required for new auto-commercial and motorcycle dealers, all-terrain vehicle, motorhome, and
recreational trailer dealers only per location.
$ 70.00 For each dealer plate (plus county fees, if applicable).*
$ 72.00 For each motorcycle plate (plus county fees, if applicable).*
* This figure will vary depending on the county where your business is located. Contact your Inspector for the total
plate fee due for your location.
NOTE: Plates are optional, not mandatory.
Applicants with convictions, prior departmental actions, business bankruptcies, and/or outstanding
civil judgements related to the automobile industry, must file an Abbreviated Application.

+++

A VEHICLE DEALER APPLICATION CONSISTS OF THE FOLLOWING FORMS:
• OL 248A New Dealer Application Check List OR
OL 248B Used Dealer, Dealer-Wholesale Only, and Autobroker Application Check List
• OL 12 Application for Original Occupational License, (Part C)
• OL 21A Original Application for Occupational License, (Part A)
• OL 25 Surety Bond of Dealer ($50,000) OR
OL 25B Surety Bond of Motorcycle Dealer, Motorcycle Lessor-Retailer, All-Terrain Vehicle
Dealer, or Wholesale-Only Dealer (Less Than 25 Vehicles Per Year) $10,000

OR

OL 65/OL 94 with Cash Bond

OR

OL 64/OL65 with Passbook or Certiicate of Deposit

• OL 53 Authorization to Release Financial Information
• OL 124 Certiicate of Proposed Franchise
Required for new automobile, commercial, motorcycle, all- terrain vehicle, motorhome, and
recreational trailer dealers only.
• OL 902 Property Use Veriication for Vehicle Dealer’s License
• OL 29 Application for Occupational License Personal History Questionnaire, (Part B)
Required for each person listed under ownership on form OL 12.
• ADM 9050 Appointment of Director as Agent for Service of Process
• DMV 8016 Request for Live Scan Clearance (yellow copy).
Required for each person completing form OL 29. Details on page 9. Out-of-state applicants
call Occupational Licensing at (916) 229-3126 for Fingerprint Card (ADM 1316).

+++

THE FOLLOWING DOCUMENTS ARE ALSO REQUIRED AS PART OF THE APPLICATION PACKAGE:

• Used Vehicle Dealer or Dealer Wholesale-Only license only
− The original Certiicate of Completion issued by a dealer education program provider
− Proof of successfully passing the Used Dealer Test administered by DMV
• Corporation, Limited Liability Company, or Limited Liability Partnership Owned Businesses Only
A copy of the Articles of Incorporation, Corporate Minutes, or other document iled with the Secretary of State
which identiies the officers, share holders and managers, if iling as a Corporation, Limited Liability Company or
Limited Liability Partnership owned business only.
• Copy of your Fictitious Name Statement
Any business that operates under a name not the actual name of the owner is required to obtain a Fictitious
Name Statement from the city or county in the area where your business is located. If the responsible agency
determines this is not required, a letter supporting such from that agency is needed.
• Copy of lease or rental agreement
• Copy of Your City and/or County Business License
Applicants are required to obtain a city or county business license by the city or county licensing section in the
area where your business is located.
• Copy of Board of Equalization Resale Permit
All applicants are required to file an application for a Seller’s Permit. The purpose of the permit is to enable the
licensee to collect taxes on sales. A dealer-wholesale only does not collect taxes but is required to file quarterly
reports. Applications can be made through local State Board of Equalization offices.
• Photograph(s) of Business Location
• Letter of Authorization
Required for new trailer dealers only. The letters of authorization must be on the issuing manufacturers,
distributors, or remanufacturers letterhead and must show either the business or corporate name and address
of the irm exactly as it appears on the application. A letter of authorization is required for each make being sold.
NOTE: Incomplete applications will be returned.

+++

THE DIFFERENT TYPES OF DEALERS LICENSES:

TYPE LICENSE AUTHORIZED TO:
New/Used Auto-Commercial

Sell new/used automobiles and trucks to the public and licensed vehicle
dealers.
Used Auto-Commercial

Sell used automobiles and trucks to the public and licensed vehicle dealers.
Dealer-Wholesale Only

Sell to licensed vehicle dealers only.
Autobroker

Provide the service of arranging, negotiating, assisting, or effectuating, for a
fee or compensation, the purchase of a new or used vehicle, not owned by
the dealer, for a person(s).

+++

LOCATION REQUIREMENTS:
The type of dealers license you are applying for will determine your location requirements.

+++

LOCATION REQUIREMENTS

TYPE LICENSE   Property Use   Office   Sign   Display Area
New/Used A/C              •                        •             •                      •
Used A/C                          •                        •             •                      •
Wholesale Only              •                        •
Autobroker                      •                        •             •

• Property Use Verification

− Your business location must be in an area appropriate for the type of business you wish to conduct. Before
signing a lease or rental agreement, check with the agency responsible for completing the Property Use
Veriication for Vehicle Dealers License (OL 902) to ensure appropriate property use.
• Office

− Your office must be devoted exclusively for the use of your business with entry directly from the outside.Your
office must have a telephone, desk, and a filing cabinet.
− All books and records pertinent to the business must be maintained at the office (320(b) CVC).

• Sign

− Not less than 2 square feet (11709(a) CVC).

− Readable from a distance of at least 50 feet (11709(a) CVC).

− Provide information as to the dealer’s name and address (11709(a) CVC).

− Permanent in nature, able to withstand weather conditions, and erected on the exterior of the office

(408.00 CA Code of Regulations).

• Display Area

− Must be situated on the same property.
− Must be of a sufficient size to physically accommodate vehicle(s) of a type for which the dealership is
licensed to sell (409.00 CA Code of Regulations).
− Additional display areas are permitted (display only, exclusive use, and sales are not permitted) within a
radius of 1,000 feet from the principal place of business and any licensed branch location without being
subject to separate licensing (409.00(a) CA Code of Regulations).

PHOTOGRAPH PROCEDURES

IMPORTANT NOTE: The department will perform on site inspections to confirm the contents of photographs.
Submission of fraudulent application form(s) and/or photograph(s) is grounds to refuse to issue this and any
subsequent license.

− Photographs must be clear enough to ensure compliance with requirements.

− Each photograph must be dated and signed.

− Photograph must be attached to a sheet of paper, labeled and numbered according to directions below.

PHOTOGRAPH REQUIREMENTS

TYPE LICENSE               Office   Location   Sign   Display Area
Wholesale Only                    •                 •
New Vehicle Dealer            •                 •               •                    •
Used Vehicle Dealer           •                 •               •                   •
Autobroker (no retail)       •                 •               •

DIRECTIONS FOR PHOTOGRAPH REQUIREMENTS

• Office
− Photographs must clearly show an office set up to perform the duties required by the license type, including
adequate secure storage for accountable materials and records.
• Entrance
− Photograph(s) of the office entrance, which includes the office address from the outside of the building.
(NOTE: See directions under sign for further directions if the address is not affixed near the office entrance
or to the exterior of the building.)
− If the office entrance is not directly accessible from the exterior, then a photograph from the corridor showing
the direct entrance is also required.

• Office Use
− Exclusive Office Use: A full photograph from the entrance to the back wall which includes both side walls.
Option: Two or more photographs that can be placed together covering the entire office area.
− Non-Exclusive Office Use: Businesses involving vehicles or their component parts must be conducted
separate from other types of businesses. Provide photographs that clearly show the physical division
between businesses involving vehicles or their component parts, (1670 CVC).

• Books and Records
− Photograph(s) of where the books and records pertinent to the type of business being conducted are kept
(320 CVC).

• Sign
− Photograph(s) must clearly show a sign permanently affixed to the exterior of the building, visible from a
distance of fifty (50) feet. If the address is not visible on the exterior of the building, then it must appear on
the sign.

− Sign From Fifty (50) Feet:

A photograph of the sign from a distance of fifty (50) feet is required.

− Sign From Property Entrance:

A photograph of the sign from the nearest public entrance to the property.

• Display Area

− Photograph(s) must clearly show an area large enough for the type of vehicle(s) for sale and must be for the
exclusive use of the licensee.
− Photographs of the complete display area.
− Photograph(s) that shows the proximity of the display area(s) to the office. If the display area is not in the
immediate vicinity of the office, another permanently installed sign is required to identify the business name
and office address.
− Photograph(s) that includes display area sign(s). If utilizing designated parking spaces, a sign must be
permanently installed designating the spaces for the exclusive use of the licensee (business name). A copy
of a contract or lease agreement for the spaces must be included with the application.

• Location

− Licensees with minimal license requirements must submit a photograph that clearly shows the place of
business (exterior of building and/or property), posted business name sign and area for licensed activity.
IMPORTANT
All application forms must be neatly printed in blue or black ink or typed.To be acceptable, they must be free from
strikeouts, whiteout (luid or tape), or corrections. All information requested must be complete and accurate.

+++

INSTRUCTIONS FOR COMPLETING THE VEHICLE DEALER APPLICATION:

Application for Original Occupational License, (Part C), OL 12

A. Ownership Information:

Enter the true full name(s), title, and Date of Birth of:

− The individual.

− Each partner (designate whether general or limited).

− Each principal officer and director, or stockholder of the corporation participating in the direction, control
and management of the policy of the business.

− Each member and manager of the Limited Liability Company participating in the direction, control and
management of the policy of the business.

− Each member of the Association participating in the direction control and management of the
Association.
B. Certiication:
Complete Section 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5 depending on whether the ownership of the firm is an individual, partnership,
corporation, Limited Liability Company, or Association.

Original Application for Occupational License, (Part A), OL 21A
A. Firm Information: Check the box of the type license you are applying for. If applying for dealer, select
category and mark appropriate box for Autobroker.

B. Main Office: Enter the full name(s) of the individual, partners, Corporation, Limited Liability Company or
Association.

Firm Name: Enter your business name.

Firm Address, City, State, Zip Code: Enter your business address, city, state, and zip code

Area Code/Telephone Number: Enter your business area code and telephone number.

C. Check the Vehicles to be Sold, Manufactured or Distributed at This Location:

Check the appropriate
boxes for the type(s) of vehicles you will be selling.

D. Plate(s) Request: Enter the number of plates desired.

E. For Dismantler Only: N/A

F. For Manufacturer or Remanufacturer Only: N/A

G. Financial Institution Business Account Information:
Enter the name of the bank where business account is carried, the bank’s address, area code and telephone
number.
Account Number: Enter the business account number.
Name of person authorized to draw funds or issue checks from account. Enter the name(s) of person(s)
authorized to draw funds or write checks from the account.
If bank account is not carried under same name as shown on this application, under what name is it
carried? Enter the name the account is carried under if not the same as your business.

H. Property Use Approval: Check the appropriate box, indicating whether your dealership’s location meets
property use requirements by either the city or the county.

I. Property Data: Check the appropriate box if the property is leased, rented, or owned.
Lease or Rental Period: Enter the lease or rental period.
Approximate Square Feet: Complete the size of the property in square feet.
If the property is leased or rented, complete the following: Enter the property owner’s full name, address,
city and telephone number.
Area Code/Telephone Number: Enter your business area code and telephone number.

J. Applicant Certiication: The person who signed the Application for Original Occupational License Part C, OL
12, must complete the certiication on this form.
Surety Bond Options
Applicants must submit one of the following:
• Surety Bond of Dealer, OL 25 ($50,000).
• Surety Bond of Motorcycle Dealer, Motorcycle Lessor-Retailer, All-Terrain Vehicle Dealer, or Wholesale-Only
Dealer (Less Than 25 Vehicles Per Year), OL 25B ($10,000).
OR
• In lieu of one of the above surety bond forms, the following deposits (see NOTICE) may be accepted:
− Cash (forms OL 65 and OL 94).
− A passbook account assigned to DMV (forms OL 64 and OL 65).
− A certiicate of deposit made payable to DMV (form OL 65).
NOTICE: Pursuant to Vehicle Code Section 11710.2, the director may order the deposit returned at the
expiration of any of the following dates:
− Three (3) years from the date a licensee has ceased to do business. (Close of business must be reported
to DMV Inspector.)
− Three (3) years from the date a licensee has ceased to be licensed, if the director is satisied that there
are no outstanding claims against the deposit.
− Five (5) years from the date a licensee has secured and maintained a dealer bond (on a form speciied
above), and the director is satisied that there are no outstanding claims against the deposit.
− A judge of a superior court may order the return of the deposit prior to the expiration of the dates provided
upon evidence satisfactory to the judge that there are no outstanding claims against the deposit.

If you obtain a Surety Bond, it must be completed as follows:

• Sole owner

− Individual name and DBA firm name.

• Partnerships

− Names of all partners and DBA firm name.

• Corporations

− Corporate name and DBA; or

− Corporate name only if DBA is the same.

• Limited Liability Company

− Limited Liability Company name and DBA; or

− Limited Liability Company name only if DBA is the same.

• Association

− Association name and DBA; or

− Association name only if DBA is the same.

To be acceptable, the Surety Bond must:
• Be signed by the surety company.
Authorization to Release Financial Information, OL 53
1. Licensee Name: Enter your name. First, middle, last and your business name.
2. Firm Name: Enter the name of your business.
3. Financial Institution: Enter the name of the bank where business account is carried.
4. Signed: Sign your name.
5. Title: Enter your title.
6. Date: Date the application.

This form must be signed by a sole owner, all partners, a corporate officer, Limited Liability Company member/
manager, or Association member.

+++

Certiicate of Proposed Franchise, OL 124

Required of new automobile, commercial, motorcycle, all-terrain vehicle, motorhome, and recreational trailer dealers
only. The OL 124 must be signed by a person on the ownership structure of the licensed manufacturer or distributor,
or by a licensed representative of the manufacturer or distributor. An OL 124 is required for each make being sold.

+++

Property Use Veriication for Vehicle Dealers License, OL 902

This form is to be completed by an official of the agency responsible for zoning in your area and submitted with your
application for license to a Department Inspector.

+++

Application For Occupational License, (Part B), Personal History Questionnaire, OL 29

The following individuals are required to complete personal history questionnaires and furnish a Request for Live
Scan Service receipt or Fingerprint Cards: 1) sole owners; 2) all partners; and 3) all individuals listed on the ownership
structure of the business.

A. Applicant Information
Name: Enter your name. Last, first, middle.
Business Area Code/Telephone Number: Enter the business area code and telephone number.
Residence address: Enter address, city, county and zip code.
Home Area Code/Telephone Number: Enter your home area code and telephone number.
Date of Birth, Sex, Color Hair, Eye Color, Height, and Weight.
Driver License/Identiication Number: Enter your Driver License/Identiication Number.
Issuing State: Enter the state that issued your Driver License/Identiication.
Expiration Date: Enter the expiration date of your Driver License/Identiication Number
Social Security Number: Enter your social security number.

B. Employment History for the Past Three Years: Begin with your most recent job. List each separately.
List your employment for the last three (3) years.

C. Education: List your education.

D. Background Information:

1. Have you ever been known by or used any name other than the name appearing on this questionnaire?
Answer yes or no. If yes, list name(s). Examples: Robert Joseph Smith, Robert J. Smith, Bob Smith

2. Have you previously been or are you now licensed or have you ever applied in this state as a vehicle
salesperson, representative, distributor, dealer, registration service, dismantler, manufacturer,
remanufacturer, transporter, vehicle veriier, lessor-retailer, driving school owner, operator, or
instructor, traffic violator school owner, operator or instructor or all-terrain vehicle safety training
organization or instructor? Answer yes or no. If yes, list license number: If you do not remember the
number, indicate so.

3. Have you ever had a business or occupational license issued by this department or an application for
such license refused, revoked, suspended or subjected to other disciplinary action or were you ever
a partner, managerial employee, officer, director, or stockholder in a firm licensed by this department,
and the license was revoked, suspended or subject to other disciplinary action? Answer yes or no. If
yes, list license number, type of license, action by department, and date of action.

4. Were you ever the holder of an occupational license issued by another state, authorizing the same
or similar activities of a license, and that license was revoked or suspended for cause and was never
reissued, or was suspended for cause, and the terms of suspension have not been fulilled? Answer
yes or no. If yes, describe type of license, list license number, and state license was issued.

5. Have you ever had a civil judgement rendered against you? Answer yes or no.
If yes, was it a result of your activity under an occupational license issued by this department?
Answer yes or no. If yes, state amount and whether paid or unpaid.

6. Were you ever a partner, managerial employee, officer, director, or stockholder in a firm that had a
civil judgement rendered against it? Answer yes or no. If yes, state amount and whether paid or unpaid.

7. Have you ever declared bankruptcy or were you ever a partner, managerial employee, officer, director,
or stockholder in a irm that declared bankruptcy? Answer yes or no. If yes, give date bankruptcy filed
and name and location of court of jurisdiction and indicate personal or business.

8. Do you currently have any criminal charges pending against you in any jurisdiction? Answer yes or
no. If yes, state the court, case number and the nature of the charges.

9. Answer questions 9(a) – (d).These questions relate to any disciplinary actions, dismissals, demotions,
adverse action from employment or involvement in any civil or administrative cases, etc. Answer yes
or no. If yes, provide details.

10. All Applicants: ( Excluding traffic offenses ) Have you ever been convicted, placed on probation,
or released from incarceration following conviction for any crime or offense, either Felony or
Misdemeanor, of any jurisdiction within the last ten (10) years. Answer yes or no. Include any conviction
where you were pardoned, pled nolo contendere, or where the conviction was expunged, dismissed, set
aside or removed from the record under Penal Code Section 1203.4.

+++

Read the information in the IMPORTANT NOTICE box. Applicants Initials Required: Initial the form.
IMPORTANT NOTE: A background investigation is conducted on all applicants. Failure to disclose any/all
convictions may result in the refusal, denial, or revocation of your license.
E. Misdemeanor or Felony Convictions: List all convictions.
F. Applicant Certiication: Enter the city, state, and title.
Signature: Sign your name.
Date: Date the application.
Applicants with convictions, prior departmental actions, business bankruptcies, and/or outstanding
civil judgements related to the automobile industry, must file an Abbreviated Application.

+++

Appointment of Director as Agent for Service or Process,ADM 9050

The Appointment of Director as Agent for Service or Process enables the service of legal process on the Director of
Motor Vehicles in the extended absence of the licensed principal. The Appointment of Director as Agent for Service
or Process must agree exactly with the wording on the application or it will be rejected. Required for each person
listed under ownership on OL 12.

+++

Request for Live Scan Service, DMV 8016

Every person applying for an Occupational License must furnish a copy of their Request for Live Scan Service
receipt when submitting their application to the Department of Motor Vehicles.
Live Scan is an inkless electronic ingerprinting process. The fingerprints are electronically transmitted to the
Department of Justice (DOJ) for completion of a criminal background check.
Contact your local Police Department, Sheriff’s Office, or District Education Office to determine the Live Scan site
nearest you.There are more than 130 facilities throughout the state and at least one in each county. Call in advance,
some locations are by appointment only. A photo ID will be required. A Live Scan list is available from DOJ’s Live
Scan internet address at http://ag.ca.gov/ingerprints/publications/contact.htm.
The live scan fingerprinting service fee varies. The cost to electronically fingerprint the applicant is determined by
the local live scan agency. According to DOJ, they can charge a fee sufficient to recover their costs. The $32 DOJ
criminal record check fee is also collected at the live scan site.
If you have been previously licensed by the Department of Motor Vehicles, Occupational Licensing (within the past
3 years), please complete Question #2 on the Personal History Questionnaire (OL 29) and do not complete the
Request For Live Scan Service.

+++

Fingerprint Card,ADM 1316
A fingerprint card must be submitted for out-of-state applicants only. Fingerprint cards may be obtained by calling
Occupational Licensing at (916) 229-3126 or contacting your local Inspector. Fingerprints must be taken at a local
law enforcement agency either the Police Department or Sheriff’s Office.

+++

WHERE TO FILE YOUR APPLICATION:

Submit the required fees, forms, and documents to your local Inspector (this can be done at the time of exam). To
ensure an Inspector will be available to assist you, please call for an appointment. Detailed office information is
available at www.dmv.ca.gov/fo/inspector_office.htm.

TIME REQUIRED TO ISSUE THE LICENSE:

Upon receipt of a complete application for a license which is accompanied with the appropriate fee, the department
shall, within 120 days, make a thorough investigation of the information contained in the application (11704(b)
CVC).
A complete application is one that contains all the necessary completed forms (e.g., documents, bond, letters
of authorization, signatures, fees, etc.), as required for the issuance of a license. Incomplete applications will be
returned to the applicant for correction and/or deiciency(ies).

TEMPORARY PERMITS:

Permits and supplies to operate will be issued by an Inspector only after all requirements are fulilled, the background
check performed is clear, and your location has been inspected and approved.

ABBREVIATED APPLICATIONS:

The purpose of an abbreviated application is to allow applicants with convictions, prior departmental actions,
business bankruptcies, and/or outstanding civil judgments related to the automobile industry, to discover if a license
will be issued or reissued without incurring the possible unnecessary expenses of obtaining a bond, establishing a
place of business, and/or attending a dealer education program.
To expedite the review process, applicants with convictions may submit certiied copies of the arresting agencies
report and the court documents with their application.
An abbreviated application must be submitted to determine your eligibility for a license.
An abbreviated application consists of the following fees and documents:
• $175 Nonrefundable application fee
• $ 1 Family Support Program Fee
• OL 12, Application for Original Occupational License (Part C)
• OL 21A, Original Application for Occupational License (Part A)
• OL 29, Personal History Questionnaire (Part B)
• ADM 1316 Fingerprint Card (out-of-state applicants only).
• DMV 8016 Request For Live Scan Service (receipt).
If you are considering submitting an abbreviated application, contact the Occupational Licensing Inspector in your
area for assistance.

DEALER EDUCATION PROGRAM
Applicants applying for a used dealer or dealer-wholesale only must attend a dealer education program and pass a
written examination administered by the Department of Motor Vehicles before submitting their application (11704.5
CVC).
The purpose of this program is to ensure that applicants are aware of the laws and regulations governing the
operation of a used vehicle dealership in California.

• What is a Dealer Education Provider?

A dealer education program provider is a private vendor who has been authorized by the DMV to instruct
potential applicants for a used vehicle dealer license on laws and regulations governing the operation of a used
vehicle dealership in California. Dealer Education Provider’s are listed on our website at:

www.dmv.ca.gov/vehindustry/ol/dlr_edu_provider.htm

• Who is required to successfully complete a dealer education program?
− Sole owner
− All partners who manage the business
− A corporate officer who manages the business

• Who is not required to successfully complete a dealer education program?
− A person applying for a new vehicle dealer’s license or any employee of that dealer.
− A person who holds a valid license as an automobile dismantler, an employee of that dismantler, or an
applicant for an automobile dismantler’s license.
− A person applying for a motorcycle only dealer’s license or any employee of that dealer.
− A person applying for a trailer only dealer’s license or any employee of that dealer.
− A person applying for an all-terrain only dealer’s license or any employee of that dealer.

• Where do I go after I successfully complete the dealer education class?

After successfully completing the class you will be issued a completion certiicate. You must contact a DMV
Inspector in your area to take the test. The test consists of 40 questions and must be passed with at least 70%
accuracy.
For testing appointments and information regarding a dealer’s license, please call one of the Inspectors in your
area.
You must present your original completion certiicate, issued by the provider, and your current California driver’s
license or California identiication card to take the test.

NOTE: Completion certiicates issued for completion of approved dealer education programs will be valid for
submission with new dealer license applications for a period of only one year from the date of program completion
(268.08[b] CA Code of Regulations).

• Is there a charge to take the test?
Yes, you will be charged $16 to take the test. If you do not pass, you may retake the test after a seven (7) day
waiting period.You will be charged $16 each time the test is taken.

• What if I can’t pass the test?
If, after three attempts, you cannot pass the test, you will be referred to the education provider listed on your
completion certiicate to determine if additional training is needed.

• Can I submit my application before attending the dealer education class?
Applications for a used vehicle dealer’s license will not be accepted by the department without proof of completion
of the used dealer education program and proof of successfully passing the examination or proof of being
licensed as a vehicle dealer within the past 36 months.

• Where can I obtain application forms?
You may call at (916) 229-3126 or download the application from the Internet at www.dmv.ca.gov

how to complete your DMV car dealer license application

+++

The purpose of this pamphlet is to inform the prospective vehicle dealer applicant of the requirements to obtain
a license from the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) and provides detailed information and instructions in
completing and submitting your application.

+++

HOW TO USE THIS PAMPHLET

+++

We have tried to arrange this book in much the same order you should follow in establishing your business. In
addition, to assist you, we’ve created check lists (New Dealer Application, OL 249A or Used Dealer and Autobroker,
OL 249B or Dealer-Wholesale Only, OL 248C) listing the items required when submitting your application to the
department. These check lists may be downloaded from our website at www.dmv.ca.gov.

+++

DMV ADVISORY STATEMENT

The information required on the attached forms pertain to eligibility for issuance of an occupational license. It is
required under authority of Division 5 of the California Vehicle Code. Failure to provide the information is cause for
refusal to issue an occupational license.

+++

Application information is public record, regularly used by law enforcement agencies, and is open to inspection by
the public. Some information contained in these records is classiied as conidential or personal pursuant to the
Information Practices Act of 1977 and the Public Records Act and is exempt from disclosure. Individuals are entitled
to inspect or obtain copies of information contained in their record during regular office hours.
The Deputy Director of the Licensing Operations Division,

2570 24th Street, Sacramento, CA. 95818,

is responsible
for maintaining record information.

+++

DEALER DEFINED

Section 285 of the California Vehicle Code (CVC) deines a dealer who:
(a) For commission, money, or other thing of value, sells, exchanges, buys or offers for sale, negotiates or attempts
to negotiate, a sale or exchange of an interest in a vehicle subject to registration or a motorcycle, snowmobile,
subject to identiication under this code, or induces or attempts to induce any person to buy or exchange an
interest in a vehicle and, who receives or expects to receive a commission, money brokerage fees, proit, or any
other thing of value, from either the seller or purchaser of said vehicle; or
(b) Is engaged wholly or in part in the business of selling vehicles or buying or taking in trade, vehicles for the
purpose of resale, selling, or offering for sale, or consigned to be sold, or otherwise dealing in vehicles, whether
or not such vehicles are owned by the person.

+++

BACKGROUND INVESTIGATION

A background investigation is conducted on all applicants and disclosure of a conviction may result in a temporary
operating permit not being issued.
Failure to disclose any and all convictions may result in the refusal, denial, or revocation of your license.
Pursuant to CVC Section 11703, the department may refuse to issue a license to any applicant who has been
convicted of a crime or committed any act or engaged in any conduct involving moral turpitude which is substantially
related to the qualiications, functions, or duties of the licensed activity.
A plea of nolo contendere is a conviction within the meaning of this section. In addition, Article 4 and Article 6.1
of Title 13, of the California Code of Regulations (CCR) provide guidelines used by the department in determining
whether a license should be issued.

+++

THE FEE SCHEDULE IS:
$175.00 Nonrefundable original application fee.
$ 1.00 Family Support Program fee.
$100.00 Autobroker (plus original application fee).
$ 70.00 For each branch location (if applicable).
$225.00 New Motor Vehicle Board Fee
Required for new auto-commercial and motorcycle dealers, all-terrain vehicle, motorhome, and
recreational trailer dealers only per location.
$ 70.00 For each dealer plate (plus county fees, if applicable).*
$ 72.00 For each motorcycle plate (plus county fees, if applicable).*
* This figure will vary depending on the county where your business is located. Contact your Inspector for the total
plate fee due for your location.
NOTE: Plates are optional, not mandatory.
Applicants with convictions, prior departmental actions, business bankruptcies, and/or outstanding
civil judgements related to the automobile industry, must file an Abbreviated Application.

+++

A VEHICLE DEALER APPLICATION CONSISTS OF THE FOLLOWING FORMS:
• OL 248A New Dealer Application Check List OR
OL 248B Used Dealer, Dealer-Wholesale Only, and Autobroker Application Check List
• OL 12 Application for Original Occupational License, (Part C)
• OL 21A Original Application for Occupational License, (Part A)
• OL 25 Surety Bond of Dealer ($50,000) OR
OL 25B Surety Bond of Motorcycle Dealer, Motorcycle Lessor-Retailer, All-Terrain Vehicle
Dealer, or Wholesale-Only Dealer (Less Than 25 Vehicles Per Year) $10,000

OR

OL 65/OL 94 with Cash Bond

OR

OL 64/OL65 with Passbook or Certiicate of Deposit

• OL 53 Authorization to Release Financial Information
• OL 124 Certiicate of Proposed Franchise
Required for new automobile, commercial, motorcycle, all- terrain vehicle, motorhome, and
recreational trailer dealers only.
• OL 902 Property Use Veriication for Vehicle Dealer’s License
• OL 29 Application for Occupational License Personal History Questionnaire, (Part B)
Required for each person listed under ownership on form OL 12.
• ADM 9050 Appointment of Director as Agent for Service of Process
• DMV 8016 Request for Live Scan Clearance (yellow copy).
Required for each person completing form OL 29. Details on page 9. Out-of-state applicants
call Occupational Licensing at (916) 229-3126 for Fingerprint Card (ADM 1316).

+++

THE FOLLOWING DOCUMENTS ARE ALSO REQUIRED AS PART OF THE APPLICATION PACKAGE:

• Used Vehicle Dealer or Dealer Wholesale-Only license only
− The original Certiicate of Completion issued by a dealer education program provider
− Proof of successfully passing the Used Dealer Test administered by DMV
• Corporation, Limited Liability Company, or Limited Liability Partnership Owned Businesses Only
A copy of the Articles of Incorporation, Corporate Minutes, or other document iled with the Secretary of State
which identiies the officers, share holders and managers, if iling as a Corporation, Limited Liability Company or
Limited Liability Partnership owned business only.
• Copy of your Fictitious Name Statement
Any business that operates under a name not the actual name of the owner is required to obtain a Fictitious
Name Statement from the city or county in the area where your business is located. If the responsible agency
determines this is not required, a letter supporting such from that agency is needed.
• Copy of lease or rental agreement
• Copy of Your City and/or County Business License
Applicants are required to obtain a city or county business license by the city or county licensing section in the
area where your business is located.
• Copy of Board of Equalization Resale Permit
All applicants are required to file an application for a Seller’s Permit. The purpose of the permit is to enable the
licensee to collect taxes on sales. A dealer-wholesale only does not collect taxes but is required to file quarterly
reports. Applications can be made through local State Board of Equalization offices.
• Photograph(s) of Business Location
• Letter of Authorization
Required for new trailer dealers only. The letters of authorization must be on the issuing manufacturers,
distributors, or remanufacturers letterhead and must show either the business or corporate name and address
of the irm exactly as it appears on the application. A letter of authorization is required for each make being sold.
NOTE: Incomplete applications will be returned.

+++

THE DIFFERENT TYPES OF DEALERS LICENSES:

TYPE LICENSE AUTHORIZED TO:
New/Used Auto-Commercial

Sell new/used automobiles and trucks to the public and licensed vehicle
dealers.
Used Auto-Commercial

Sell used automobiles and trucks to the public and licensed vehicle dealers.
Dealer-Wholesale Only

Sell to licensed vehicle dealers only.
Autobroker

Provide the service of arranging, negotiating, assisting, or effectuating, for a
fee or compensation, the purchase of a new or used vehicle, not owned by
the dealer, for a person(s).

+++

LOCATION REQUIREMENTS:
The type of dealers license you are applying for will determine your location requirements.

+++

LOCATION REQUIREMENTS

TYPE LICENSE   Property Use   Office   Sign   Display Area
New/Used A/C              •                        •             •                      •
Used A/C                          •                        •             •                      •
Wholesale Only              •                        •
Autobroker                      •                        •             •

• Property Use Verification

− Your business location must be in an area appropriate for the type of business you wish to conduct. Before
signing a lease or rental agreement, check with the agency responsible for completing the Property Use
Veriication for Vehicle Dealers License (OL 902) to ensure appropriate property use.
• Office

− Your office must be devoted exclusively for the use of your business with entry directly from the outside.Your
office must have a telephone, desk, and a filing cabinet.
− All books and records pertinent to the business must be maintained at the office (320(b) CVC).

• Sign

− Not less than 2 square feet (11709(a) CVC).

− Readable from a distance of at least 50 feet (11709(a) CVC).

− Provide information as to the dealer’s name and address (11709(a) CVC).

− Permanent in nature, able to withstand weather conditions, and erected on the exterior of the office

(408.00 CA Code of Regulations).

• Display Area

− Must be situated on the same property.
− Must be of a sufficient size to physically accommodate vehicle(s) of a type for which the dealership is
licensed to sell (409.00 CA Code of Regulations).
− Additional display areas are permitted (display only, exclusive use, and sales are not permitted) within a
radius of 1,000 feet from the principal place of business and any licensed branch location without being
subject to separate licensing (409.00(a) CA Code of Regulations).

PHOTOGRAPH PROCEDURES

IMPORTANT NOTE: The department will perform on site inspections to confirm the contents of photographs.
Submission of fraudulent application form(s) and/or photograph(s) is grounds to refuse to issue this and any
subsequent license.

− Photographs must be clear enough to ensure compliance with requirements.

− Each photograph must be dated and signed.

− Photograph must be attached to a sheet of paper, labeled and numbered according to directions below.

PHOTOGRAPH REQUIREMENTS

TYPE LICENSE               Office   Location   Sign   Display Area
Wholesale Only                    •                 •
New Vehicle Dealer            •                 •               •                    •
Used Vehicle Dealer           •                 •               •                   •
Autobroker (no retail)       •                 •               •

DIRECTIONS FOR PHOTOGRAPH REQUIREMENTS

• Office
− Photographs must clearly show an office set up to perform the duties required by the license type, including
adequate secure storage for accountable materials and records.
• Entrance
− Photograph(s) of the office entrance, which includes the office address from the outside of the building.
(NOTE: See directions under sign for further directions if the address is not affixed near the office entrance
or to the exterior of the building.)
− If the office entrance is not directly accessible from the exterior, then a photograph from the corridor showing
the direct entrance is also required.

• Office Use
− Exclusive Office Use: A full photograph from the entrance to the back wall which includes both side walls.
Option: Two or more photographs that can be placed together covering the entire office area.
− Non-Exclusive Office Use: Businesses involving vehicles or their component parts must be conducted
separate from other types of businesses. Provide photographs that clearly show the physical division
between businesses involving vehicles or their component parts, (1670 CVC).

• Books and Records
− Photograph(s) of where the books and records pertinent to the type of business being conducted are kept
(320 CVC).

• Sign
− Photograph(s) must clearly show a sign permanently affixed to the exterior of the building, visible from a
distance of fifty (50) feet. If the address is not visible on the exterior of the building, then it must appear on
the sign.

− Sign From Fifty (50) Feet:

A photograph of the sign from a distance of fifty (50) feet is required.

− Sign From Property Entrance:

A photograph of the sign from the nearest public entrance to the property.

• Display Area

− Photograph(s) must clearly show an area large enough for the type of vehicle(s) for sale and must be for the
exclusive use of the licensee.
− Photographs of the complete display area.
− Photograph(s) that shows the proximity of the display area(s) to the office. If the display area is not in the
immediate vicinity of the office, another permanently installed sign is required to identify the business name
and office address.
− Photograph(s) that includes display area sign(s). If utilizing designated parking spaces, a sign must be
permanently installed designating the spaces for the exclusive use of the licensee (business name). A copy
of a contract or lease agreement for the spaces must be included with the application.

• Location

− Licensees with minimal license requirements must submit a photograph that clearly shows the place of
business (exterior of building and/or property), posted business name sign and area for licensed activity.
IMPORTANT
All application forms must be neatly printed in blue or black ink or typed.To be acceptable, they must be free from
strikeouts, whiteout (luid or tape), or corrections. All information requested must be complete and accurate.

+++

INSTRUCTIONS FOR COMPLETING THE VEHICLE DEALER APPLICATION:

Application for Original Occupational License, (Part C), OL 12

A. Ownership Information:

Enter the true full name(s), title, and Date of Birth of:

− The individual.

− Each partner (designate whether general or limited).

− Each principal officer and director, or stockholder of the corporation participating in the direction, control
and management of the policy of the business.

− Each member and manager of the Limited Liability Company participating in the direction, control and
management of the policy of the business.

− Each member of the Association participating in the direction control and management of the
Association.
B. Certiication:
Complete Section 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5 depending on whether the ownership of the firm is an individual, partnership,
corporation, Limited Liability Company, or Association.

Original Application for Occupational License, (Part A), OL 21A
A. Firm Information: Check the box of the type license you are applying for. If applying for dealer, select
category and mark appropriate box for Autobroker.

B. Main Office: Enter the full name(s) of the individual, partners, Corporation, Limited Liability Company or
Association.

Firm Name: Enter your business name.

Firm Address, City, State, Zip Code: Enter your business address, city, state, and zip code

Area Code/Telephone Number: Enter your business area code and telephone number.

C. Check the Vehicles to be Sold, Manufactured or Distributed at This Location:

Check the appropriate
boxes for the type(s) of vehicles you will be selling.

D. Plate(s) Request: Enter the number of plates desired.

E. For Dismantler Only: N/A

F. For Manufacturer or Remanufacturer Only: N/A

G. Financial Institution Business Account Information:
Enter the name of the bank where business account is carried, the bank’s address, area code and telephone
number.
Account Number: Enter the business account number.
Name of person authorized to draw funds or issue checks from account. Enter the name(s) of person(s)
authorized to draw funds or write checks from the account.
If bank account is not carried under same name as shown on this application, under what name is it
carried? Enter the name the account is carried under if not the same as your business.

H. Property Use Approval: Check the appropriate box, indicating whether your dealership’s location meets
property use requirements by either the city or the county.

I. Property Data: Check the appropriate box if the property is leased, rented, or owned.
Lease or Rental Period: Enter the lease or rental period.
Approximate Square Feet: Complete the size of the property in square feet.
If the property is leased or rented, complete the following: Enter the property owner’s full name, address,
city and telephone number.
Area Code/Telephone Number: Enter your business area code and telephone number.

J. Applicant Certiication: The person who signed the Application for Original Occupational License Part C, OL
12, must complete the certiication on this form.
Surety Bond Options
Applicants must submit one of the following:
• Surety Bond of Dealer, OL 25 ($50,000).
• Surety Bond of Motorcycle Dealer, Motorcycle Lessor-Retailer, All-Terrain Vehicle Dealer, or Wholesale-Only
Dealer (Less Than 25 Vehicles Per Year), OL 25B ($10,000).
OR
• In lieu of one of the above surety bond forms, the following deposits (see NOTICE) may be accepted:
− Cash (forms OL 65 and OL 94).
− A passbook account assigned to DMV (forms OL 64 and OL 65).
− A certiicate of deposit made payable to DMV (form OL 65).
NOTICE: Pursuant to Vehicle Code Section 11710.2, the director may order the deposit returned at the
expiration of any of the following dates:
− Three (3) years from the date a licensee has ceased to do business. (Close of business must be reported
to DMV Inspector.)
− Three (3) years from the date a licensee has ceased to be licensed, if the director is satisied that there
are no outstanding claims against the deposit.
− Five (5) years from the date a licensee has secured and maintained a dealer bond (on a form speciied
above), and the director is satisied that there are no outstanding claims against the deposit.
− A judge of a superior court may order the return of the deposit prior to the expiration of the dates provided
upon evidence satisfactory to the judge that there are no outstanding claims against the deposit.

If you obtain a Surety Bond, it must be completed as follows:

• Sole owner

− Individual name and DBA firm name.

• Partnerships

− Names of all partners and DBA firm name.

• Corporations

− Corporate name and DBA; or

− Corporate name only if DBA is the same.

• Limited Liability Company

− Limited Liability Company name and DBA; or

− Limited Liability Company name only if DBA is the same.

• Association

− Association name and DBA; or

− Association name only if DBA is the same.

To be acceptable, the Surety Bond must:
• Be signed by the surety company.
Authorization to Release Financial Information, OL 53
1. Licensee Name: Enter your name. First, middle, last and your business name.
2. Firm Name: Enter the name of your business.
3. Financial Institution: Enter the name of the bank where business account is carried.
4. Signed: Sign your name.
5. Title: Enter your title.
6. Date: Date the application.

This form must be signed by a sole owner, all partners, a corporate officer, Limited Liability Company member/
manager, or Association member.

+++

Certiicate of Proposed Franchise, OL 124

Required of new automobile, commercial, motorcycle, all-terrain vehicle, motorhome, and recreational trailer dealers
only. The OL 124 must be signed by a person on the ownership structure of the licensed manufacturer or distributor,
or by a licensed representative of the manufacturer or distributor. An OL 124 is required for each make being sold.

+++

Property Use Veriication for Vehicle Dealers License, OL 902

This form is to be completed by an official of the agency responsible for zoning in your area and submitted with your
application for license to a Department Inspector.

+++

Application For Occupational License, (Part B), Personal History Questionnaire, OL 29

The following individuals are required to complete personal history questionnaires and furnish a Request for Live
Scan Service receipt or Fingerprint Cards: 1) sole owners; 2) all partners; and 3) all individuals listed on the ownership
structure of the business.

A. Applicant Information
Name: Enter your name. Last, first, middle.
Business Area Code/Telephone Number: Enter the business area code and telephone number.
Residence address: Enter address, city, county and zip code.
Home Area Code/Telephone Number: Enter your home area code and telephone number.
Date of Birth, Sex, Color Hair, Eye Color, Height, and Weight.
Driver License/Identiication Number: Enter your Driver License/Identiication Number.
Issuing State: Enter the state that issued your Driver License/Identiication.
Expiration Date: Enter the expiration date of your Driver License/Identiication Number
Social Security Number: Enter your social security number.

B. Employment History for the Past Three Years: Begin with your most recent job. List each separately.
List your employment for the last three (3) years.

C. Education: List your education.

D. Background Information:

1. Have you ever been known by or used any name other than the name appearing on this questionnaire?
Answer yes or no. If yes, list name(s). Examples: Robert Joseph Smith, Robert J. Smith, Bob Smith

2. Have you previously been or are you now licensed or have you ever applied in this state as a vehicle
salesperson, representative, distributor, dealer, registration service, dismantler, manufacturer,
remanufacturer, transporter, vehicle veriier, lessor-retailer, driving school owner, operator, or
instructor, traffic violator school owner, operator or instructor or all-terrain vehicle safety training
organization or instructor? Answer yes or no. If yes, list license number: If you do not remember the
number, indicate so.

3. Have you ever had a business or occupational license issued by this department or an application for
such license refused, revoked, suspended or subjected to other disciplinary action or were you ever
a partner, managerial employee, officer, director, or stockholder in a firm licensed by this department,
and the license was revoked, suspended or subject to other disciplinary action? Answer yes or no. If
yes, list license number, type of license, action by department, and date of action.

4. Were you ever the holder of an occupational license issued by another state, authorizing the same
or similar activities of a license, and that license was revoked or suspended for cause and was never
reissued, or was suspended for cause, and the terms of suspension have not been fulilled? Answer
yes or no. If yes, describe type of license, list license number, and state license was issued.

5. Have you ever had a civil judgement rendered against you? Answer yes or no.
If yes, was it a result of your activity under an occupational license issued by this department?
Answer yes or no. If yes, state amount and whether paid or unpaid.

6. Were you ever a partner, managerial employee, officer, director, or stockholder in a firm that had a
civil judgement rendered against it? Answer yes or no. If yes, state amount and whether paid or unpaid.

7. Have you ever declared bankruptcy or were you ever a partner, managerial employee, officer, director,
or stockholder in a irm that declared bankruptcy? Answer yes or no. If yes, give date bankruptcy filed
and name and location of court of jurisdiction and indicate personal or business.

8. Do you currently have any criminal charges pending against you in any jurisdiction? Answer yes or
no. If yes, state the court, case number and the nature of the charges.

9. Answer questions 9(a) – (d).These questions relate to any disciplinary actions, dismissals, demotions,
adverse action from employment or involvement in any civil or administrative cases, etc. Answer yes
or no. If yes, provide details.

10. All Applicants: ( Excluding traffic offenses ) Have you ever been convicted, placed on probation,
or released from incarceration following conviction for any crime or offense, either Felony or
Misdemeanor, of any jurisdiction within the last ten (10) years. Answer yes or no. Include any conviction
where you were pardoned, pled nolo contendere, or where the conviction was expunged, dismissed, set
aside or removed from the record under Penal Code Section 1203.4.

+++

Read the information in the IMPORTANT NOTICE box. Applicants Initials Required: Initial the form.
IMPORTANT NOTE: A background investigation is conducted on all applicants. Failure to disclose any/all
convictions may result in the refusal, denial, or revocation of your license.
E. Misdemeanor or Felony Convictions: List all convictions.
F. Applicant Certiication: Enter the city, state, and title.
Signature: Sign your name.
Date: Date the application.
Applicants with convictions, prior departmental actions, business bankruptcies, and/or outstanding
civil judgements related to the automobile industry, must file an Abbreviated Application.

+++

Appointment of Director as Agent for Service or Process,ADM 9050

The Appointment of Director as Agent for Service or Process enables the service of legal process on the Director of
Motor Vehicles in the extended absence of the licensed principal. The Appointment of Director as Agent for Service
or Process must agree exactly with the wording on the application or it will be rejected. Required for each person
listed under ownership on OL 12.

+++

Request for Live Scan Service, DMV 8016

Every person applying for an Occupational License must furnish a copy of their Request for Live Scan Service
receipt when submitting their application to the Department of Motor Vehicles.
Live Scan is an inkless electronic ingerprinting process. The fingerprints are electronically transmitted to the
Department of Justice (DOJ) for completion of a criminal background check.
Contact your local Police Department, Sheriff’s Office, or District Education Office to determine the Live Scan site
nearest you.There are more than 130 facilities throughout the state and at least one in each county. Call in advance,
some locations are by appointment only. A photo ID will be required. A Live Scan list is available from DOJ’s Live
Scan internet address at http://ag.ca.gov/ingerprints/publications/contact.htm.
The live scan fingerprinting service fee varies. The cost to electronically fingerprint the applicant is determined by
the local live scan agency. According to DOJ, they can charge a fee sufficient to recover their costs. The $32 DOJ
criminal record check fee is also collected at the live scan site.
If you have been previously licensed by the Department of Motor Vehicles, Occupational Licensing (within the past
3 years), please complete Question #2 on the Personal History Questionnaire (OL 29) and do not complete the
Request For Live Scan Service.

+++

Fingerprint Card,ADM 1316
A fingerprint card must be submitted for out-of-state applicants only. Fingerprint cards may be obtained by calling
Occupational Licensing at (916) 229-3126 or contacting your local Inspector. Fingerprints must be taken at a local
law enforcement agency either the Police Department or Sheriff’s Office.

+++

WHERE TO FILE YOUR APPLICATION:

Submit the required fees, forms, and documents to your local Inspector (this can be done at the time of exam). To
ensure an Inspector will be available to assist you, please call for an appointment. Detailed office information is
available at www.dmv.ca.gov/fo/inspector_office.htm.

TIME REQUIRED TO ISSUE THE LICENSE:

Upon receipt of a complete application for a license which is accompanied with the appropriate fee, the department
shall, within 120 days, make a thorough investigation of the information contained in the application (11704(b)
CVC).
A complete application is one that contains all the necessary completed forms (e.g., documents, bond, letters
of authorization, signatures, fees, etc.), as required for the issuance of a license. Incomplete applications will be
returned to the applicant for correction and/or deiciency(ies).

TEMPORARY PERMITS:

Permits and supplies to operate will be issued by an Inspector only after all requirements are fulilled, the background
check performed is clear, and your location has been inspected and approved.

ABBREVIATED APPLICATIONS:

The purpose of an abbreviated application is to allow applicants with convictions, prior departmental actions,
business bankruptcies, and/or outstanding civil judgments related to the automobile industry, to discover if a license
will be issued or reissued without incurring the possible unnecessary expenses of obtaining a bond, establishing a
place of business, and/or attending a dealer education program.
To expedite the review process, applicants with convictions may submit certiied copies of the arresting agencies
report and the court documents with their application.
An abbreviated application must be submitted to determine your eligibility for a license.
An abbreviated application consists of the following fees and documents:
• $175 Nonrefundable application fee
• $ 1 Family Support Program Fee
• OL 12, Application for Original Occupational License (Part C)
• OL 21A, Original Application for Occupational License (Part A)
• OL 29, Personal History Questionnaire (Part B)
• ADM 1316 Fingerprint Card (out-of-state applicants only).
• DMV 8016 Request For Live Scan Service (receipt).
If you are considering submitting an abbreviated application, contact the Occupational Licensing Inspector in your
area for assistance.

DEALER EDUCATION PROGRAM
Applicants applying for a used dealer or dealer-wholesale only must attend a dealer education program and pass a
written examination administered by the Department of Motor Vehicles before submitting their application (11704.5
CVC).
The purpose of this program is to ensure that applicants are aware of the laws and regulations governing the
operation of a used vehicle dealership in California.

• What is a Dealer Education Provider?

A dealer education program provider is a private vendor who has been authorized by the DMV to instruct
potential applicants for a used vehicle dealer license on laws and regulations governing the operation of a used
vehicle dealership in California. Dealer Education Provider’s are listed on our website at:

www.dmv.ca.gov/vehindustry/ol/dlr_edu_provider.htm

• Who is required to successfully complete a dealer education program?
− Sole owner
− All partners who manage the business
− A corporate officer who manages the business

• Who is not required to successfully complete a dealer education program?
− A person applying for a new vehicle dealer’s license or any employee of that dealer.
− A person who holds a valid license as an automobile dismantler, an employee of that dismantler, or an
applicant for an automobile dismantler’s license.
− A person applying for a motorcycle only dealer’s license or any employee of that dealer.
− A person applying for a trailer only dealer’s license or any employee of that dealer.
− A person applying for an all-terrain only dealer’s license or any employee of that dealer.

• Where do I go after I successfully complete the dealer education class?

After successfully completing the class you will be issued a completion certiicate. You must contact a DMV
Inspector in your area to take the test. The test consists of 40 questions and must be passed with at least 70%
accuracy.
For testing appointments and information regarding a dealer’s license, please call one of the Inspectors in your
area.
You must present your original completion certiicate, issued by the provider, and your current California driver’s
license or California identiication card to take the test.

NOTE: Completion certiicates issued for completion of approved dealer education programs will be valid for
submission with new dealer license applications for a period of only one year from the date of program completion
(268.08[b] CA Code of Regulations).

• Is there a charge to take the test?
Yes, you will be charged $16 to take the test. If you do not pass, you may retake the test after a seven (7) day
waiting period.You will be charged $16 each time the test is taken.

• What if I can’t pass the test?
If, after three attempts, you cannot pass the test, you will be referred to the education provider listed on your
completion certiicate to determine if additional training is needed.

• Can I submit my application before attending the dealer education class?
Applications for a used vehicle dealer’s license will not be accepted by the department without proof of completion
of the used dealer education program and proof of successfully passing the examination or proof of being
licensed as a vehicle dealer within the past 36 months.

• Where can I obtain application forms?
You may call at (916) 229-3126 or download the application from the Internet at www.dmv.ca.gov